American Pathways Univeristy

Educational Programs

See the University Bulletin or the University Catalog for more details

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

 

Introducing Students to the World of Ideas and Preparing Graduates for the World of Work

 

GENERAL PROGRAMS

American Pathways University offers programs of General Education, the Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts and Master’s degrees, majors, vocational pathways, and certificate and non-degree programs.

GENERAL EDUCATION

General Education Requirement (30 credits for the A.A. and 44 credits for the B.A.)

Consistent with the standards of accreditation and the best thinking of educational philosophy, theories and values, a General Education Curriculum is required of every student for graduation. General Education is intended to impart the breadth of common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that every educated person should possess.

American Pathways University has adopted the General Education requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree approved by the Colorado Department of Higher Education (CDHE) and utilized by the state’s public universities and colleges, which requires a total of 35 academic credits. These requirements include communication (6 credits), mathematics (3 credits), arts & humanities (9 credits), social & behavioral sciences (9 credits), and physical & life sciences (8 credits). APU meets or exceeds these requirements. In order to accentuate the student’s breadth of knowledge, American Pathways University’s General Education requires additional courses for a total of 44 credits. APU also has adopted the CDHE mandated learning outcomes in addition to APU’s own articulated outcomes. See Addendum.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS (A.A.)

The Associate of Arts degree includes courses in General Education Curriculum and a career emphasis. The Associate of Arts prepares students for further study toward the baccalaureate. Generally, the associate degree can be completed in two years of study. Of the credits required for an associate degree, a minimum of 30 credits must be taken at APU.

The A.A. degree gives students an advantage in pursuing vocational and career objectives. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment. For employment opportunities associated with each A.A. Degree emphasis, see the employment outcomes for the B.A. foundational courses in this Catalog.

 Associate of Arts Graduation Requirements

  1. One year of residency with no fewer than 30 credits taken at American Pathways University.
  2. Recommendation of the faculty.
  3. No outstanding financial obligations to the University.
  4. Completion of 60 semester credits of the Associate of Arts academic requirements, including the General Education courses for the A.A. (30 Credits) and a career emphasis (30 credits).
  5. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher.

A.A. Degree Emphases

During the Sophomore year, A.A. degree-track students satisfy the 30-credit requirement for an emphasis in one field of study by completing the courses designated by “†” of the B.A. foundation requirement for an emphasis in the program of Allied Health, Business, Management, or Ministry.

  • A. in Allied Health: Program emphases in human services counseling and applied psychology
  • A. in Business: Program emphases in business applications and professional development
  • A. in Management: Program emphasis in management and leadership
  • A. in Ministry: Program emphasis in vocational ministry and church education

The World of Ideas: A.A. Degree General Education Requirement (30 Credits)

General Education is required of every A.A. Degree student for graduation regardless of emphasis. The General Education requirement includes courses in English, speech, language, mathematics, history, philosophy, ethics, sociology, economics, science, the fine arts, political science, and leadership.

 A.A. Degree General Education Curriculum Requirement (27 Credits)

Course No. Course Title Credits
COMMUNICATION (6 credits from following) 6
ENG 101 English Composition I (3) – Required
ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric (3) or
SPE 201      Introduction to Speech (3)
LANGUAGE (2 credits from following) 2
LAN 123 Hebrew I (2) or
LAN 133      Greek I (2) or
LAN 143      Spanish I (2) or
LAN 103      English As Second Language I (2)
ARTS AND HUMANITIES (6 credits from following) 6
PHL 211 Intro to Ethics and Society (3) – Required
FNA 208 Film Appreciation (3) or
MUS 201      Music Appreciation (3) or
LIT 201      Introduction to Literature (3)
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (9 credits from following) 9
HIS 121 Survey of Western Civilization I (3) – Required
SOC 271 Interpersonal Sociology (3) – Required
POL 111 American National Government (3) or
ECO 201      Introduction to Economics (3) or
SOC 221      Introduction to Sociology (3) or
PSY 221      General Psychology (3)
MATHEMATICS (3 credits from following) 3
MAT 110 College Algebra (3)
MAT 211 General Statistics (3)
SCIENCE (4 credits from following) 4
SCI 110 Introduction to Astronomy (4) or
SCI 211      Earth Systems Science (4) or
SCI 221      Science and Scientific Method (4)

Note: Certain General Education courses are required for the Associate of Arts Degree as follows:

  • SOC 271 Interpersonal Sociology must be taken at American Pathways University by all A.A. students during the first term of a student’s matriculation.
  • Four courses that must be completed at APU by all A.A. students—HIS 121 Survey of Western Civilization I, PHL 201 Figures in Western Philosophy, PHL 211 Introduction to Ethics and Society, and SCI 221 Science & Scientific Method.
  • Depending on a student’s A.A. emphasis, the following Social and Behavioral Science courses are required—ECO 201 required for Business; POL 111 required for Management; PSY 221 required for Human Services, Psychology, and Ministry; and SOC 221 required for Professional Development.

 

The World of Work: A.A. Degree Emphasis Requirement (30 credits)

At least 30 credits must be from the core course requirements of a vocational pathway of one educational program. Courses designated by “†” must be included in the 30-credit requirement of the A.A. These 30 credits must be completed during the sophomore year and be 300-level courses. Where there is an insufficient number of 300-level courses in the vocational cluster core course requirement, a student may select additional 300-level courses from a vocational pathway within the educational program in order to complete the 30-credit requirement.

 

A.A. General Education and Emphasis Learning Outcomes

 The Associate’s degree has a detailed statement of learning outcomes, that is, the information and skills that a student should possess upon successfully completing the General Education requirements of the degree. These outcomes are stated in the Catalog and in course syllabi. The general learning outcome of an A.A. Degree is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the vocational emphases of allied health, business, management, and ministry. Specific learning outcomes for an A.A. Emphasis are found in the corresponding B.A. section of this Catalog.

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A.)

The Bachelor of Arts prepares students for success in selected vocations and graduate study. The B.A. requires a General Education Curriculum that features a broad range of studies in the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and communication. The B.A. requires completion of a vocational pathway.

 

The baccalaureate requires 120 college credits and generally can be completed in four years of study. Of the credits required for a Bachelors degree, a minimum of 30 credits must be taken at APU. Subsequent Bachelor degrees earned at American Pathways University require a minimum of 30 credits in residence for each additional degree.

 

The B.A. degree gives students an advantage in pursuing vocational and career objectives. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment. For employment related categories associated with each B.A. Degree Major, see the B.A. Vocational Cluster for the major in this Catalog.

 

Bachelor of Arts Graduation Requirements

  1. One year of residency with no fewer than 30 credits taken at American Pathways University.
  2. Recommendation of the faculty.
  3. Formal and timely application for graduation.
  4. No outstanding financial obligations to the university.
  5. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher.
  6. Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits of the Bachelor of Arts acquirements: the General Education curriculum (44 credits), the vocational cluster and career pathway (60 credits), and personal development electives (16 credits).
  • General Education Requirement 44 credits
  • Major Field Vocational Cluster and Career Pathway 60 credits
  • Personal Development and Electives 16 credits

 

B.A. Degree Majors

A student satisfies the requirements for a major in one of the following fields of study by completing the courses of the B.A. foundation requirement for Allied Health, Business, Management, or Ministry and the courses of a career concentration.

  • A. in Allied Health: Program majors in Human Services or Psychology; Career concentrations in addiction counseling, domestic violence counseling, human resource management psychology, institutional psychology, or therapeutic psychology
  • A. in Business: Program majors in Business Applications or Professional Studies; Career concentrations in business management, entrepreneurship, project management, business information technology, human resource management, or project management consultation
  • A. in Management: Program majors in Management or Leadership; Career concentrations in transformational management, public policy leadership, or non-governmental organizational (NGO) management and leadership
  • A. in Ministry: Program majors in Ministerial Studies or Theological Studies; Career concentration in pastoral ministry, church education, chaplaincy, or spiritual formation counseling

 

B.A. Degree Minors

 A minor entails the completion of 18 semester credits, depending on the field of study. A student whose vocational field yields a minimum of 18 college-equivalent credits in that field through the portfolio documentation process may make application to have those credits count toward an academic minor in that field.

 

B.A. General Education Learning Outcomes

 The Bachelor’s degree has a detailed statement of learning outcomes, that is, the information and skills that a student should possess upon successfully completing the General Education requirements of the degree and the vocational cluster and concentration selected for the B.A. degree. These outcomes are stated in this Catalog (see Addendum) and in course syllabi.

 

B.A. Major Field Learning Outcomes

 Each major field and vocational concentration has a detailed statement of learning outcomes, that is, the information and skills that a student should possess upon successfully completing the program’s requirements. These outcomes are stated in the American Pathways University Academic Catalog (available from the Office of Academic Affairs or at the University’s Website) and in course syllabi.

 

The World of Ideas: B.A. Degree General Education Requirement (44 credits)

 General Education is required of every B.A. Degree student for graduation regardless of major or vocational concentration. The General Education requirement includes courses in English, speech, language, mathematics, history, philosophy, ethics, sociology, economics, science, the fine arts, political science, and leadership.

 

Course No. Course Title Credits
COMMUNICATION (6 credits from following) 6
ENG 101 English Composition I (3) – Required
ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric (3) or
SPE 201      Introduction to Speech (3)
LANGUAGE (6 credits from following) 6
LAN 123 Hebrew I (2) and
LAN 124      Hebrew II (2) or
LAN 133 Greek I (2) and
LAN 134      Greek II (2) or
LAN 143 Spanish I (2) and
LAN 144      Spanish II (2) or
LAN 103 English as Foreign Language I (2) and
LAN 104      English as Foreign Language II (2)
Language Comprehension (2) – Required: LAN 256, or 257, or 258 or 259
ARTS AND HUMANITIES (9 credits from following) 9
PHL 201 Figures in Western Philosophy (3) – Required
PHL 211 Intro to Ethics and Society (3) – Required
FNA 208 Film Appreciation (3)
MUS 201      Music Appreciation (3) or
LIT 201      Introduction to Literature (3)
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (12 credits from following) 12
HIS 121 Survey of Western Civilization I (3) – Required
SOC 271 Interpersonal Sociology (3) – Required
HIS 131 Survey of Western Civilization II (3) or
HIS 221      American/US History to 1865 (3) or
HIS 231      American/US History since 1865 (3) or
POL 111 American National Government (3) or
ECO 201      Introduction to Economics (3) or
SOC 221      Introduction to Sociology (3) or
PSY 221      General Psychology (3)
MATHEMATICS (3 credits from following) 3
MAT 110 College Algebra (3) or
MAT 211      General Statistics (3)
SCIENCE (8 credits from following) 8
SCI 201 Introduction to Astronomy (4) and/or
SCI 211      Earth Systems Science (4) and/or
SCI 221      Science and Scientific Method (4)

Note: Certain General Education courses are required as follows:

  • SOC 271 Interpersonal Sociology must be taken at American Pathways University by all students during the first term of a student’s matriculation.
  • Four courses that must be completed at APU—HIS 121 Survey of Western Civilization I, PHL 201 Figures in Western Philosophy, PHL 211 Introduction to Ethics and Society, and one science course.
  • Depending on a student’s major field program, the following Social and Behavioral Science courses are required—ECO 201 required for Business; POL 111 required for Management; PSY 221 required for Human Services, Psychology, and Ministry; and SOC 221 required for Professional Development.

 

The World of Work Requirements: A.A. Emphasis (30 credits) and B.A. Major (60 credits)

 

MAJOR FIELDS, EMPHASES AND CAREER CONCENTRATIONS

 

Each of the following B.A. Degree programs has a 36-credit foundational requirement shared in common by each 24-credit concentration for a total of 60 credits. A.A. Degree students must satisfy an emphasis requirement by completing courses designated by “†” of the B.A. foundational requirement for a total of 30 credits.

 

SCHOOL OF ALLIED HEALTH

 

B.A. in Allied Health, with Majors in Human Services or Psychology

The School of Allied Health provides a human services counseling major and an applied psychology major—each major with its own foundational curriculum (36 credits) and distinct concentrations (24 credits). Completion of the foundation and a concentration satisfies the requirements of a Major in Human Services or Psychology.

 

A Bachelor’s Degree in Allied Health gives students an advantage in pursuing career objectives in human services or psychology. The Associate’s designated courses (“†”) are designed to provide students with an entry-level vocational foundation. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment.

 

HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM (60 credits)

Credentials: The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts

The Human Services Major provides preparation for careers in human services counseling, including addiction counseling and domestic violence counseling. Students complete the General Education requirements (44 credits), the foundation requirement (36 credits), and the courses of a concentration (24 credits). An additional 16 elective credits are required to complete a B.A. degree for a total of 120 credits.

 

During the sophomore year, Allied Health A.A. degree-track students with an emphasis in human services must complete courses designated by “†” of the following listed courses of the Human Services Foundation Requirement for a total of 30 credits.

 

Students interested in certification by the Colorado Department of Human Services as Certified Addiction Counselors (CAC) are advised that APU does not issue CAC certificates. The concentration in addiction counseling studies alcoholism, drug abuse, gambling, eating disorders, and violence addiction. Courses are part of the requirements for the Certified Addiction Counselor certificates (CAC 1, 2, 3) issued by the Colorado Department of Human Services – Division of Behavioral Health. CAC I, II, III certification require 1000, 2000, 3000 field hours, respectively. Completion of the concentration also prepares the student to take the NAADAC Level I and Level II (NCAC I and II) examinations. NAADAC is the Association for Addiction Professionals, the largest member organization serving addiction counselors, educators, and other addiction-focused health care professionals, who specialize in addiction prevention, treatment and education. Completion of the APU program prepares the student to take the NAADAC (NCAC II) examination, which is a prerequisite for licensure as an addiction counselor, but passing the NAADAC examination is not guaranteed.

 

The overall learning outcome of the B.A. in Human Services is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the field of human services. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in teaching, research, social work, health sciences, advertising, marketing, grant writing, personnel and business management, public administration, conflict mediation, drug counseling, domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and a variety of entry-level human services related employment positions typically filled by HR departments of service agencies, government, business, justice system, or community and social services. As a degree in the behavioral sciences, the B.A. in Human Services meets the educational requirement by the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health for the highest level of licensure as a Certified Addictions Counselor (CAC III).

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, skills and qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

Human Services Foundation Requirement (36 credits; A.A. required courses designated by †)

Course No. Course Title Credits
HSE 204 Counseling the Substance Abuser † 3
HSE 220 Multicultural Issues in Human Services 3
HSE 223 Group Counseling Skills † 3
HSE 226 Trauma Informed Care † 3
HSE 240 Psychopathology and the Mental Health Clinician † 3
HSE 246 Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing † 3
HSE 248 Therapeutic Cognitive Behavior † 3
HSE 250 Addiction Treatment, Immunity and Infectious Disease † 3
HSE 251 Pharmacology of Drugs and Alcohol † 3
HSE 266 Ethical and Legal Issues in Human Services † 3
PHL 221 Critical Thinking † 3
PSY 205 Applied Psychology 3

Learning Outcomes for the human services foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the human services foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Human Services Employment Opportunities. Completion of the human services foundation requirement (including A.A. Degree requirements indicated by “†”) meets the educational requirement for licensure as a Certified Addictions Counselor level I and II by the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health. An additional 1,000 and 2,000 hours, respectively, of clinically supervised work experience is required for licensure and certification. Employment opportunities include self-employment in counseling and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments involve teaching, counseling, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of addiction pharmacology and diagnostic skills to identify pharmacological syndromes in addiction and implement appropriate therapeutic intervention. Knowledge of demographics and application of appropriate counseling skills vis-à-vis psychopathology, pharmacology, and specific care paradigms and psychologies.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Analytical skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making. Utilization of client-centered, counselor-directed, didactic, and experiential techniques in counseling. Soft skills, including personal traits and interpersonal relationships valued by employers and essential to successful organizations.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Professional ethical standards, dilemma resolution and best practices, applicable government regulations, intervention and therapeutic strategies and techniques, patient/counselor relationships, and testing and assessment methods.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Identify and analyze norms, social order, conflict, deviance, social changes, and minorities as these concepts and processes are relevant to the human services field;
  • Develop and apply psychological analysis of various components of group dynamics; and
  • Explore and evaluate (by case study method) dimensions of professional ethics (professional practice, personal and social ethics) with applications to one’s profession (business, church, community leadership).

 

Concentration in Addiction Counseling (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
HSE 355 Psychotherapy Internship I 3
HSE 356 Psychotherapy Internship II 3
HSE 451 Psychotherapy Internship III 3
HSE 460 Clinical Supervision in Human Services 3
HSE 470 Advanced Motivational Interviewing and Professional Practice 3
PSY 241 Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 331 Social Psychology 3
PSY 481 Behavioral Psychology 3

Learning Outcomes for the addiction counseling concentration: As a result of successfully completing the addiction counseling requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Addiction Counseling Employment Opportunities. Completion of the foundation requirement and the addiction counseling concentration meets the educational requirement for licensure as a Certified Addictions Counselor level I, II, and III by the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health. An additional 1,000, 2,000, and 2,000 hours, respectively, of clinically supervised work experience is required for licensure and certification. Employment opportunities include self-employment in counseling and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments involve teaching, counseling, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Principles, best practices, and regulatory requirements for clinical supervision. Resistance mitigation skills for particular recovery-stages and relapse-situations and motivational interviewing skills that promote essential change. Preparation for the NAADAC examination.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Professional best practices, including therapeutic and relational counseling skills. Clinical records management skills and supervisory feedback techniques. Working knowledge of behavioral psychology and predictable human responses to environmental stimuli, including analytical skills of interpreting measurable data and human activity and utilizing the behavioral theories and techniques of Pavlov, Watson, and Skinner.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Understanding and evaluation of counseling approaches, such as Reality, Behavior and Gestalt therapy and theories proposed by such original therapist as Rogers, Frankl, Adler and Freud.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Ability to differentiate between substance abuse and dependence—the alcoholic and non-alcoholic;
  • Counsel dual diagnosis clients using a multi-dimensional bio-psycho-social model and help clients assess their own level of cultural awareness, sensitivity, and competency; and
  • Utilize pre- and post-test counseling, risk assessment, risk reduction, and HIV data in infectious disease/alcohol/drug treatment counseling.

 

Concentration in Domestic Violence Counseling (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
HSE 357 Human Services Internship I 3
HSE 358 Human Services Internship II 3
HSE 390 Fundamentals of Intervention 3
HSE 440 Pathologies of Violence 3
HSE 450 Human Services Internship III 3
HSE 470 Advanced Motivational Interviewing and Professional Practice 3
HSE 480 Violence Offenders 3
PSY 331 Social Psychology 3

Learning Outcomes for the concentration in domestic violence counseling: As a result of successfully completing the marriage and family counseling requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Domestic Violence Counseling Employment Opportunities. Completion of the foundation requirement and the domestic violence counseling concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in domestic violence counseling, conflict mediation, and personnel and business management and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments involve teaching, counseling, research, social work, human sciences, grant writing, personnel and business management, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of violence abusers and victims and the dynamics of perpetrator treatment. Development of a psychologically integrated model and skills of domestic violence intervention. Resistance mitigation skills for particular recovery-stages and relapse-situations and motivational interviewing skills that promote essential change.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Working knowledge of the MCMI-III data and batterer typologies, risk assessment, and treatment planning.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Evaluation, application, and contrast of violence and abuser related laws and the codes of ethics of the State of Colorado and American Association of Marriage and Family Therapist and resultant dilemmas.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Describe and utilize statistical and other metric techniques to describe and analyze human behavior;
  • Describe and demonstrate Family Life Cycle theory and theory of continuous/discontinuous changes; and
  • Application of an outline of the history of marriage and family theory in counselor-client contexts.

 

PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM (60 credits)

Credentials: The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts

The Psychology Major provides preparation for careers that utilize human psychology in workplace and therapeutic settings. Specific concentrations to applied psychology careers include institutional applied psychology (such as HR departments and student services) and therapeutic applied psychology (such as counselors, caseworkers, and paraprofessionals in allied health). Students complete the General Education requirements (44 credits), the foundation requirement (36 credits), and the courses of a career concentration (24 credits). An additional 16 elective credits are required to complete a B.A. degree for a total of 120 credits.

 

During the sophomore year, Allied Health A.A. degree-track students with an emphasis in applied psychology must complete courses designated by “†” in the following listed courses of the Applied Psychology Foundation Requirement for a total of 30 credits plus 30 General Education credits for a total of 60 credits.

 

The professional practice of psychology beyond applied psychology (e.g., paraprofessionals), however, requires postgraduate-level training toward the master’s or doctorate degree. In addition to vocational concentrations, the undergraduate program develops a broad-based competency that creates a deeper understanding of human functioning and prepares students for graduate school.

 

The overall learning outcome of the B.A. in Psychology is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the field of psychology. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in teaching, research, social work, health sciences, advertising, marketing, grant writing, personnel and business management, public administration, conflict mediation, drug counseling, domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and a variety of entry-level psychology or para-psychology related employment positions typically filled by HR departments of service agencies, government, business, justice system, or community and social services. As a degree in allied health and the behavioral sciences, the B.A. in Psychology meets the educational requirement by the Colorado Division of Behavioral Health for the highest level of licensure as a Certified Addictions Counselor (CAC III).

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, skills and qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

Psychology Foundation Requirement (36 credits; A.A. required courses designated by †)

Course No. Course Title Credits
PSY 205 Applied Psychology † 3
PSY 215 Cognitive Psychology (Age Specific) † 3
PSY 231 Life Span Developmental Psychology † 3
PSY 241 Abnormal Psychology † 3
PSY 245 Counseling Skills Praxis † 3
PSY 341 Tests and Measurements (Experimental Psychology) 3
HSE 203 Counseling Skills † 3
HSE 204 Counseling the Substance Abuser † 3
HSE 223 Group Counseling Skills † 3
HSE 248 Therapeutic Cognitive Behavior † 3
HSE 311 Spiritual Alliances 3
PHL 221 Critical Thinking † 3

Learning Outcomes for applied psychology foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the psychology foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Applied Psychology Employment Opportunities. Completion of the psychology foundation requirement is preparation for employment opportunities including self-employment in a variety of enterprises and services involving human relationships, motivation, and behavior, such as advising, advocacy, mediation and conflict resolution, marketing and sales, and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a paraprofessional psychology background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, mediation, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of age-specific and pathology-specific applied psychology (cognitive, developmental, abnormal) and related counseling skills and praxiology.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Analytical skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making. Utilize psychology-enhanced research skills to formulate counseling strategies, practices, and techniques relative to human motivation and behavior. Evaluation and use of therapeutic tests, measurements, and alliances. Soft skills, including personal traits and interpersonal relationships valued by employers and essential to successful organizations.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Broad-based competency and depth understanding of human functioning that leads to success and advancement in psychology-related professional endeavors and education.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Paraprofessional skills in public and private human services venues, including clinics and hospitals, social services casework, educational advising, human resource departments, and church and para-church ministries; and
  • Working knowledge of general psychology, human resource skills, or cognitive fields in vocations or graduate studies for which the bachelor’s degree with a psychology major is prerequisite or desirable.

 

Concentration in Human Resource Management, with a psychology emphasis (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
PSY 301 Psychology and Group Dynamics or PSY 481 Behavioral Psychology 3
BUS 201 Group and Organizational Dynamics or PSY 308 Career Psychology 3
BUS 202 Leadership and Management 3
BUS 311 Interpersonal Relationships and Dynamics 3
BUS 331 Human Resource Management 3
BUS 431 Small Business Administration 3
BUS 489 Empowering People 3
HSE 246 Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing 3

Learning Outcomes for the concentration in human resources management, with a psychology emphasis: As a result of successfully completing the psychology human resource management requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Human Resources Management Employment Opportunities. Completion of the psychology foundation requirement and the human resources management concentration, with an emphasis in psychology, prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of human resource management enterprises and services in personnel and business management and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a psychology background may involve teaching and training personnel, personnel counseling, research, social work, human sciences, mediation and conflict resolution, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of the interpersonal relationships of group and organizational dynamics and human resources leadership and counseling skills, including use of psychometric tools and analysis applicable to career psychology, development, and guidance.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Working knowledge of behavioral psychology and predictable human responses to environmental stimuli, including analytical skills of interpreting measurable data and human activity and utilizing the behavioral theories of Pavlov, Watson, and Skinner.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Comprehension of and competency in business HR leadership and management skills of planning, recruitment, and administration, including personnel performance evaluation, empowerment and motivational skills, and delegation and decision-making.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
    • Skills that facilitate HR planning, recruitment, staffing, performance management, compensation, and benefits management, including skills utilizing effective human management theory and practice in a business, government or other career setting;
    • Ability to utilize a systems management model to identify and solve organizational problems in business, including advanced skills in decision-making and problem solving techniques in management settings;
    • Competency in the effective use of verbal and nonverbal communication skills, feedback processes, conflict resolution techniques, clear lines of authority, and group and task management to promote healthy work relationships and freedom for frontline personnel to timely respond to business needs; and
    • Management skills for financial planning, budgeting, control, capital investment, and risk.

 

Concentration in Institutional Applied Psychology (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
PSY 301 Psychology and Group Dynamics 3
PSY 308 Career Psychology 3
PSY 331 Social Psychology 3
PSY 401 Environmental Psychology 3
PSY 441 Neural Psychology 3
PSY 481 Behavioral Psychology 3
PSY 490 Psychology Capstone 3
HSE 460 Clinical Supervision in Human Services 3

Learning Outcomes for the institutional applied psychology concentration: As a result of successfully completing the institutional applied psychology requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Institutional Applied Psychology Employment Opportunities. Completion of the psychology foundation requirement and the institutional applied psychology concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of organizational/industrial enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a psychology background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, mediation and conflict resolution, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of and competency in skills of interpersonal relationships of group and organizational dynamics, human resources, leadership, and communication for decision-making, conflict resolution, and institutional productivity.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Principles, best practices, and regulatory requirements for clinical supervision. Working knowledge of behavioral psychology and predictable human responses to environmental stimuli, including analytical skills of interpreting measurable data and human activity and utilizing the behavioral theories and techniques of Pavlov, Watson, and Skinner.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. An appreciation for the human brain and nervous system and related functions and abilities in an institutional context and personal hands-on workplace experience of institutional applied psychology in such venues of clinics, hospitals, social services, casework, educational advising, human resources departments, churches, and para-church ministries.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Ability to evaluate human personality, behavior, and individuality in institutional contexts and group dynamics;
  • Able to understand and apply commonly used approaches in assessment and measurement of human personality, behavior, and social intercourse;
  • Working understanding of how the brain is organized and functions, the relationship between the mind and body, neuroscience, biological psychology, and human behavior; and
  • Understand and use the psychological paradigms and motivational predicates of human behavior (e.g., Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs), motivational theories, and leadership styles that are useful for applications of psychology in organizational and institutional environments.

 

Concentration in Therapeutic Applied Psychology (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
PSY 311 Age Specific Developmental Psychology (Child & Adolescent) 3
PSY 335 Human Nature & Psychological Method 3
PSY 401 Environmental Psychology 3
PSY 461 Death and Dying 3
PSY 471 Psychology of Religion 3
PSY 481 Behavioral Psychology 3
PSY 490 Psychology Capstone 3
HSE 429 Grief and Loss 3

Learning Outcomes for the therapeutic applied psychology concentration: As a result of successfully completing the therapeutic applied psychology requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Therapeutic Applied Psychology Employment Opportunities. Completion of the psychology foundation requirement and the therapeutic applied psychology concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of parapsychology enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a paraprofessional psychology background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, mediation and conflict resolution, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, human services, clinic and hospital venues, educational advising, human resource departments, church and para-church ministry.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of age-specific development and corresponding therapeutic skills. Counseling skills to provide therapeutic assistance and coping techniques for people dealing with death, dying, loss, or change across the spectrum of human experience and relationships.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Working knowledge of how environment and ergonomics affect human well-being and therapeutic strategy and psychological care.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. An appreciation of human nature, psychological method, and the positive and negative affects of religious attitudes and secular culture on human psychology (soul) and effective therapeutic treatment.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Psychology background for future graduate studies for which the bachelor’s degree with a psychology major is prerequisite or desirable;
  • Identify the founders and evaluate the theories of human personality of the major psychotherapy systems, including their therapeutic processes, content, effectiveness, and inter-relationships; and
  • Analyze and apply selected psychotherapy systems, strategies, and techniques;

 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

B.A. in Business, with Majors in Business or Professional Studies

The School of Business provides a business major and a professional studies major—each major with its own foundational curriculum (36 credits) and distinct career concentrations (24 credits). Completion of the foundation and a concentration satisfies the requirements of a Major in Business or Professional Studies.

 

The Bachelor’s Degree in Business gives students an advantage in pursuing career objectives and professional advancement in the field of business. The Associate’s designated courses (“†”) are designed to provide students with an entry-level vocational foundation. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment.

 

BUSINESS PROGRAM (60 credits)

Credentials: The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts

The Business Major provides preparation for careers in business applications. Specific concentrations to business careers include business management, business entrepreneurship, project management, and business information technology. Students complete the General Education requirements (44 credits), the foundational requirement (36 credits), and the courses of a career concentration (24 credits). An additional 16 elective credits are required to complete a B.A. degree for a total of 120 credits.

 

During the sophomore year, Business A.A. degree-track students with an emphasis in business applications must complete courses designated by “†” of the following listed courses of the Business Applications Foundation Requirement for a total of 30 credits plus 30 General Education credits for a total of 60 credits.

 

The overall learning outcome of the B.A. in Business is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the field of business. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in market research, advertising, marketing, grant writing, personnel and business management, business information technology, entrepreneurship, public administration, project management, conflict mediation, and a variety of business and services employment positions typically filled by HR departments of service agencies, government, business, and non-profit or community service organizations.

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, skills and qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

Business Applications Foundation Requirement (36 credits; A.A. required courses designated by †)

Course No. Course Title Credits
BUS 201 Group and Organizational Dynamics † 3
BUS 202 Leadership and Management † 3
BUS 212 Business and Interpersonal Skills † 3
BUS 221 Decision Making and Problem Solving † 3
BUS 241 Financial Management † 3
BUS 243 Accounting Systems † 3
BUS 244 Finance Systems † 3
BUS 285 Business Law † 3
BUS 411 Systems Management 3
PHL 221 Critical Thinking † 3
PHL 281 Personal and Social Ethics 3
PSY 205 Applied Psychology † 3

Learning Outcomes for the business applications foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the business foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Business Applications Employment Opportunities. Completion of the business foundation requirement is preparation for employment opportunities including self-employment in a variety of enterprises and services involving business management, entrepreneurship, and technology and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a business background may involve industrial organization and leadership training, management, business technology, marketing and sales, government, NGO and non-profits, domestic and international commerce, health care, accounting, financial planning and services, economics, personnel resources, recruitment and services, and project planning and management.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of appropriate organizational structures for a variety of business operations and ability to analyze financial reports in order to make effective business decisions. Comprehension of accounting and finance systems and business and contract law. Competencies in time management and interpersonal skills and techniques, including negotiation, workplace communication and relationships, conflict resolution, and training and coaching personnel.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Analytical skills of critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving. Leadership and management techniques including systems management, situational management and leadership, and related competencies. Use of the systems management model to identify and solve organizational problems in business. Soft skills, including personal traits and interpersonal relationships valued by employers and essential to successful organizations.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Ethical standards and ethical dilemma resolution, with applications to personal, social, professional life in the world of work.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Leadership techniques related to group and organizational dynamics; and
  • Manage healthy workplace relationships, communications, and feedback.

 

Concentration in Business Management (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No.

Course Title

Credits

BUS 311 Interpersonal Relationships and Dynamics 3
BUS 331 Human Resource Management 3
BUS 342 Business Accounting 3
BUS 362 Logistics Management or BUS 391 Project Management Scope 3
BUS 381 Project Management Systems 3
BUS 421 Leadership and Management Plan 3
BUS 431 Small Business Admin. or BUS 441 Nonprofit Business Admin. 3
BUS 489 Empowering People 3

Learning Outcomes for the business management concentration: As a result of successfully completing the business management requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Business Management Employment Opportunities. Completion of the business applications foundation requirement and the business management concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of business enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a business background may involve general business management and administration, human resource management including teaching/training/coaching, administrative assistant, contract administrator, accounting, financial analyst and comptroller, project manager, and non-profit management, such as community-based service organizations, clinics, churches, and para-church ministries.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of HR planning and management skills, recruitment and compensation, performance evaluation, and procedures for empowerment of personnel to promptly use authority and freedom to address existential internal organizational needs and changing external conditions. Leadership and management techniques, including systems management and situational leadership. Project management competencies, including scope, logistics, and systems.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Competencies in interpersonal relationships, organizational dynamics, and group behavior to promote efficient task management and resolution of group conflicts. Comprehension of the unique characteristics of non-profit business administration.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Consideration and development of an effective ethical model in a management environment.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Effective verbal and nonverbal communication and feedback techniques.
  • Fulfill the certification requirements for Project Management Professional; and
  • Ability to pass the certification test given by the Project Management Institute (PMI) and qualify for “Certified Associate in Project Management” awarded by PMI.

 

Concentration in Business Entrepreneurship (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No.

Course Title

Credits

BUS 362 Business Planning 3
BUS 371 Entrepreneurship 3
BUS 375 Brand Creation and Management 3
BUS 377 Marketing Strategies and Social Networking 3
BUS 421 Leadership and Management Plan 3
BUS 431 Small Business Administration 3
BUS 489 Empowering People 3
BUS 493 Legal Issues in Business Planning 3

Learning Outcomes for the business entrepreneurship concentration: As a result of successfully completing the business entrepreneurship requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Business Entrepreneurship Employment Opportunities. Completion of the business applications foundation requirement and the business entrepreneurship concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of business enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a business entrepreneurship background in business concepts, procedures, practices and networking may involve partnerships, C-level and mid-level management, business consultation, accounts management, marketing, leads follow up, sales representative, research and development (R&D), not-for-profit fund raising, networking, and leadership and personnel recruitment and training.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of the mindset and techniques of entrepreneurship, including inspiration, initiative, and innovation. Competencies in market research, organizational science, business planning, marketing, and business technology. Brand management and best practices for superior customer service and reviews.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Comprehension of and utilization of business law and legal resources relative to insurance, zoning, contracting, labor laws, regulating agencies, and tax implications. Development of high performance teams for administration, manage change, competitive advantage, and delivery of products and services.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Understand the place of ethics and best practices at each stage of entrepreneurial endeavor, from concept development, product/services creation, organizational efficiency/continuity, and colleague, client and customer relations. Acquaintance with the success stories, strategies, and techniques of the great entrepreneurs of history.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Understanding of social media, websites, and the internet for business application; and
  • Business economics, including incorporation, assets, leverage, investors, IPOs, and the stock market.

 

Concentration in Project Management (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
BUS 381 Project Management Systems 3
BUS 391 Project Management Scope 3
BUS 395 Project Time and Schedule Management 3
BUS 396 Project Cost Management 3
BUS 397 Project Human Resources and Communication Management 3
BUS 481 Project Risk Management 3
BUS 485 Project Procurement Management 3
BUS 491 Advanced Project Management 3

Learning Outcomes for the project management concentration: As a result of successfully completing the business project management requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Project Management Employment Opportunities. Completion of the business applications foundation requirement and the project management concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of business enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a project management background in initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and completing specific project goals, criteria, timetables and budget may involve projects and consultations in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of project planning and scheduling, time phased budgeting, human resource planning, vendor selection criteria, and project review checklists. Ability to develop a WBS and sequence it into a Gantt Chart, PERT Chart, and a Network Diagram with an analysis of the Critical Path.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Client and stakeholder communication and coordination skills and techniques. Competencies in project technical feasibility, resource availability, procurement and allocation, monitoring and tracking progress, and contingency, cost and risk management.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Preparation for passing the Global Exam for PMPÒ or CAPMÒ.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Project management competencies demonstration by passing a PMI exam equivalent in preparation for PASSING the Global Exam for PMPÒ or CAPMÒ; and
  • Project management certification is offered separately and tests are proctored daily by PMIÒ.

 

Concentration in Business Information Technology (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
BUS 345 Business Information Systems 3
BUS 376 Designing Business Presentations 3
BUS 412 Information Systems Management 3
CAP 201 Fundamentals of Computing 3
CAP 215 Computer Applications for Business 3
CAP 331 Website Design and Management 3
CAP 411 Harnessing the Web for Business 3
CAP 412 Data Mining for Business 3

Learning Outcomes for the business information technology concentration: As a result of successfully completing the business information technology requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Business Information Technology Employment Opportunities. Completion of the business applications foundation requirement and the business information technology concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of business enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring an information technology background in information systems and management, business IT applications, and commercial use of the World Wide Web may involve positions and consultations in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of IT systems and business operations. Competencies in designing business presentations, website design and management, and business use of the web.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. WWW business data mining and analysis for use in business decisions and marketing. Competencies in adding business value via the use of business information technology.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Ethical and legal aspects of information technology and business applications.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Internet connectivity and harnessing the web for business;
  • Marketing strategies using information systems and internet technologies; and
  • Trends in information technology and business.

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (60 credits)

Credentials: The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts

The Professional Studies Major provides preparation for professional career development for middle-management professionals seeking career advancement, including to executive management, and for those preparing to become managers. Specific concentrations to professional advancement include human resource management and project management consultation. Students complete the General Education requirements (44 credits), the foundational requirement (36 credits), and the courses of a career concentration (24 credits). An additional 16 elective credits are required to complete a B.A. degree for a total of 120 credits.

 

During the sophomore year, Business A.A. degree-track students with an emphasis in professional studies must complete courses designated by “†” of the following listed courses of the Professional Studies Foundation Requirement for a total of 30 credits plus 30 General Education credits for a total of 60 credits.

 

“It is not so very important for a person to learn facts. For that he does not really need a college. He can learn them from books. The value of an education … is not learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks” (Albert Einstein). This is the essence of Professional Studies at American Pathways University. The Professional Development program offers a deep view of the arts, humanities, and sciences attractive to graduate schools, corporate leadership, public service, and entrepreneurism. In addition to the concentrations listed here, the University is also able to design a vocational concentration in collaboration with the student and qualified educators and professionals both at the University and in the general community.

 

The overall learning outcome of the B.A. in Professional Studies is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment and especially career advancement in their current position in the field of business. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in market research, advertising, marketing, grant writing, personnel and business management, business information technology, entrepreneurship, public administration, project management, conflict mediation, and a variety of business and services employment positions typically filled by HR departments of service agencies, government, business, and non-profit or community service organizations.

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

Professional Development Foundation Requirement (36 credits; A.A. required courses designated by †)

Course No. Course Title Credits
LIT 209 Classic & Popular Literature † 3
LIT 211 Shakespeare † 3
LIT 231 Proverbial Literature † 3
LDR 281 Intercultural Communication † 3
PHL 221 Critical Thinking † 3
PHL 231 Ethics in the Urban World † 3
PHL 241 Argument and Persuasion † 3
PHL 281 Personal and Social Ethics † 3
PSY 205 Applied Psychology † 3
SOC 461 Urban Sociology and Anthropology 3
THE 201 Faith and Work † 3
THE 251 Biblical and Religious Topics 3

Learning Outcomes for the professional development foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the professional development foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Professional Development Employment Opportunities. Completion of the professional development foundation requirement is preparation for employment opportunities including self-employment in a variety of enterprises and services involving business management, communications, cultural literacy, interpersonal relations, and persuasion and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a professional studies background in business management, middle-management and executive leadership may involve industrial organization and leadership training, management, consultants and executive assistants, public relations, business technology, marketing and sales, government employment, social and human services of NGO and non-profit agencies, domestic and international commerce, health care, accounting, financial planning and services, economics, personnel resources, recruitment and services, project planning and management, and human resource directors and lead staff.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of cultures, social mores, and human psychology and related interpersonal and intercultural communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Analytical skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making. Persuasion skills across a broad spectrum of groups, individuals, and settings utilizing an integrated, interdisciplinary, and reasoned argument to achieve goal ownership and motivate productive action. Soft skills, including personal traits and interpersonal relationships valued by employers and essential to successful organizations.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Professional ethics applied to middle and upper management. Cultural awareness and professional utilization of perspectives and information derived from the Western Intellectual Tradition, including the Bible to Shakespeare to popular literature.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • A fundamental understanding and working knowledge of global trends and issues related to multiculturalism and ethnocentrism vis-à-vis American cultural and professional diversity; and
  • A fundamental understanding and working knowledge of the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and theology, including major concepts, events, and significance relative to professional life.

 

Concentration in Human Resource Management, with a business emphasis (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
BUS 201 Group and Organizational Dynamics or PSY 308 Career Psychology 3
BUS 202 Leadership and Management 3
BUS 311 Interpersonal Relationships and Dynamics 3
BUS 331 Human Resource Management 3
BUS 431 Small Business Administration 3
BUS 489 Empowering People 3
HSE 246 Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing 3
PSY 301 Psychology and Group Dynamics or PSY 481 Behavioral Psychology 3

Learning Outcomes for the human resources management concentration, with a business emphasis: As a result of successfully completing the business human resource management requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Business Human Resources Management Employment Opportunities. Completion of the professional development foundation requirement and the human resources management concentration, with an emphasis in business, prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of human resource management enterprises and services in personnel and business management and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a business background may involve employment market research, recruitment and interviewing, employment agreements, personnel training and management, workforce motivation and productivity, mediation and conflict resolution, and ombudsman and advocacy.
  • Information and Skills. Comprehension of and competency in business HR leadership and management skills of planning, recruitment, and administration, including personnel performance evaluation, empowerment and motivational skills, and delegation and decision-making.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Working knowledge of the interpersonal relationships of group and organizational dynamics and human resources leadership and counseling skills, including use of psychometric tools and analysis applicable to career psychology, development, and guidance.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Working knowledge of behavioral psychology and predictable human responses to environmental stimuli, including analytical skills of interpreting measurable data and human activity and utilizing the behavioral theories of Pavlov, Watson, and Skinner.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
    • Skills that facilitate HR planning, recruitment, staffing, performance management, compensation, and benefits management, including skills utilizing effective human management theory and practice in a business, government or other career setting;
    • Ability to utilize a systems management model to identify and solve organizational problems in business, including advanced skills in decision-making and problem solving techniques in management settings;
    • Competency in the effective use of verbal and nonverbal communication skills, feedback processes, conflict resolution techniques, clear lines of authority, and group and task management to promote healthy work relationships and freedom for frontline personnel to timely respond to business needs; and
    • Management skills for financial planning, budgeting, control, capital investment, and risk.

 

Concentration in Project Management Consultation (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
BUS 241 Financial Management 3
BUS 281 Project Management Systems 3
BUS 285 Business Law 3
BUS 421 Leadership and Management Plan 3
BUS 491 Advanced Project Management 3
BUS 493 Legal Issues in Business Planning 3
LDR 341 Research and Urban Analysis 3
LDR 401 Local Government Politics and Policy 3

Learning Outcomes for the project management consultation concentration: As a result of successfully completing the project management consultation requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Project Management Consultation Employment Opportunities. Completion of the professional development foundation requirement and the project management consultation concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of business enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a project management background in initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and completing specific project goals, criteria, timetables and budget may involve projects and consultations in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of project management systems, including planning and scheduling, time phased budgeting, human resource planning, vendor selection criteria, and project review checklists. Ability to develop a WBS and sequence it into a Gantt Chart, PERT Chart, and a Network Diagram with an analysis of the Critical Path.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Client and stakeholder consultation, communication and coordination skills and techniques. Competencies in project technical feasibility, resource availability, procurement and allocation, monitoring and tracking progress, and contingency, cost and risk management. Working knowledge of business law, financial management, urban analysis and public policy, and local government.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Leadership and management planning and techniques. Preparation for passing the Global Exam for PMPÒ or CAPMÒ.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Project management competencies demonstration by passing a PMI exam equivalent in preparation for PASSING the Global Exam for PMPÒ or CAPMÒ; and
  • Project management certification is offered separately and tests are proctored daily by PMIÒ.

 

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

B.A. in Management, with Majors in Management or Leadership

The School of Management provides a management major and a leadership major—each major with a shared foundational curriculum (36 credits) and a distinct career concentration (24 credits). Completion of the foundation and a concentration satisfies the requirements of a Major in Management or Leadership.

 

The Bachelor’s Degree in Management gives students an advantage in pursuing career objectives in the field of management. The Associate’s designated courses (“†”) are designed to provide students with an entry-level vocational foundation. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment.

 

The overall learning outcome of the B.A. in Management is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the fields of management and leadership. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in market research, advertising, marketing, grant writing, personnel and business management, executive leadership, entrepreneurship, public administration, conflict mediation, and a variety of management, leadership and organizational related employment positions typically filled by HR departments of service agencies, government, business, non-profit or community service organizations.

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, skills and qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAM (60 credits)

Credentials: The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts

The Management and Leadership Majors provide preparation for careers in management and leadership. Specific concentrations to management and leadership careers include transformational management, urban policy leadership, or non-governmental organizational management and leadership. Students complete the General Education requirements (44 credits), the foundation requirement (36 credits), and the courses of a career concentration (24 credits). An additional 16 elective credits are required to complete a B.A. degree for a total of 120 credits.

 

During the sophomore year, Management A.A. degree-track students with an emphasis in management and leadership must complete courses designated by “†” of the following listed courses of the Management and Leadership Foundation Requirement for a total of 30 credits plus 30 General Education credits for a total of 60 credits.

 

Management Foundation Requirement (36 credits; A.A. required courses designated by †)

Course No. Course Title Credits
LDR 202 Leadership and Management † 3
LDR 211 Group and Organizational Dynamics † 3
LDR 221 The City: Context for Change † 3
LDR 231 Community and Social Analysis † 3
LDR 241 Urban Leadership and Management † 3
LDR 251 Research and Urban Analysis † 3
LDR 461 Urban Anthropology 3
LDR 471 Urban World and Globalism 3
BUS 241 Financial Management † 3
BUS 281 Project Management Systems † 3
PHL 221 Critical Thinking † 3
PSY 205 Applied Psychology † 3

Learning Outcomes for the management and leadership foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the management and leadership foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Management and Leadership Employment Opportunities. Completion of the management and leadership foundation requirement is preparation for employment opportunities including self-employment in a variety of enterprises and services involving management and leadership and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments of private entities and public agencies requiring a management background may involve market research, advertising and marketing, personnel recruitment, development and management, business and executive management and leadership, public administration, ombudsman and advocacy, and conflict mediation and arbitration.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of group dynamics and psychology and organizational leadership and management skills. Competencies in project management systems and financial management.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Analytical skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making. Working knowledge of management theory and public policy, urban analysis and globalism data, and community and social analysis research skills. Soft skills, including personal traits and interpersonal relationships valued by employers and essential to successful organizations.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Comprehension of the urban context, anthropology, and change dynamics. Use of systems thinking to understand how the city. civic entities, and urban renewal work politically, economically, socially, and demographically.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Utilization of ethnographic research to explain attitudes and behaviors of urban constituencies, ethnicities and precincts;
  • Ability to utilize leadership models for initiation, formation and consolidation of community and organizational change; and
  • Comprehend localism and globalism perspectives, trends, and objectives.

 

Concentration in Transformational Management (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
LDR 412 Transformative Systems Management 3
LDR 451 Autobiography: Tracking Personal Change 3
LDR 463 Power and Powerlessness 3
LDR 473 Transformational Family Systems 3
LDR 483 Change Agents: Individuals & Institutions 3
BUS 391 Project Management Scope 3
BUS 431 Small Business Administration 3
PHL 281 Personal and Social Ethics 3

Learning Outcomes for the transformational management concentration: As a result of successfully completing the transformational management requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Transformational Management Employment Opportunities. Completion of the management and leadership foundation requirement and the transformational management concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of management enterprises and services specializing in organizational change and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a transformational management or leadership background may involve market research, recruitment and interviewing, employment agreements, personnel training and management, workforce motivation and productivity, mediation and conflict resolution, and ombudsman and advocacy.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of small business administration and organizational models, mission, culture, management, and workforce. Skills for assessing organizational strengths, weaknesses, essential resources, product or services, and outcomes. Comprehend the role and skills of a change-agent to determine scope, set priorities, cast vision, motivate others, and implement transforming processes.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Competencies in managing strategic and tactical organizational change and identifying transformational resources, including board, executive and management leadership, necessary personnel, qualified workforce, budget, and timetable.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Professional ethics applied to management of organizational restructuring and renewal. Personal comprehension of individual change, power, and powerlessness. Appreciation of the differences and appropriate applications of servant leadership vis-à-vis transformational, transactional, and situational management and leadership.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Ability to utilize an action plan template for short-term, intermediate, and long-term goals; and
  • Able to track and effect change utilizing autobiography and transformational family systems.

 

Concentration in Public Policy Leadership (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
LDR 371 Demographics and Planning 3
LDR 401 Local Government Politics and Policy 3
LDR 431 Community Economic Development 3
LDR 481 Intercultural Communication 3
BUS 391 Project Management Scope 3
BUS 431 Small Business Administration 3
PHL 281 Personal and Social Ethics 3
SOC 461 Urban Sociology and Anthropology 3

Learning Outcomes for the urban policy leadership concentration: As a result of successfully completing the urban policy leadership requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Urban Policy Leadership Employment Opportunities. Completion of the management and leadership foundation requirement and the policy leadership concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of public policy leadership enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring a public policy background may involve local government agency work or political organization planning, development and facilitation of the public and social welfare, including community organizer, political consultant, political party staff, business development associate, administrative assistant, grants management, and a variety of other civil and public service jobs.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of urban and inner-city precincts and local government politics and policy involving resource allocation, community development, and renewal and redistribution. Social analysis, public administration, and political skills to promote the common good. Business administration and project scope management skills.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Competencies in community analysis, models, planning, resources, and renewal. Skills in forming alliances and coordinating political and economic resources to achieve public policy goals.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Professional ethics applied to public policy and program leadership. Comprehension of public servant leadership principles and best practices. Intercultural communication competency and skills.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Comprehension of public policy and the general welfare of the inner city;
  • Working knowledge of concepts of compassion, opportunity, equality, and justice, relative to urban policies and inner city issues, needs, and cultures;
  • Effective cross-cultural communication skills between persons of different racial, ethnic, or minority demographics;
  • Comprehension and application of social science theory and research methods to the socio-political context of public policy, community development, and urban ministry; and
  • Working knowledge of the public policy agendas and interrelationships of local government, community service agencies, and faith-based organizations.

 

Concentration in Non-Governmental Organizational Management and Leadership (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
LDR 350 Faith-Based Leadership I 3
LDR 361 Faith-Based Communities and Renewal 3
LDR 411 Building Indigenous Communities 3
LDR 421 Urban Life and Christian World View 3
LDR 443 Leadership in Faith-Based Communities 3
LDR 450 Faith-Based Leadership II 3
PHL 301 Faith-Based Community Foundations 3
BUS 391 Project Management Scope or BUS 431 Small Business Administration 3

Learning Outcomes for Non-Governmental Organizational (NG0) concentration: As a result of successfully completing the NGO management and leadership requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Faith-Based Community Leadership Employment Opportunities. Completion of the management and leadership foundation requirement and the NGO management and leadership concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of NGO and faith-based community enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring an NGO, charitable or faith-based community background may involve program management, grant writing and development, agency community services, public housing and health, job training and placement, family support and safe houses, counseling, food programs, prisoner half-way houses, addiction recovery, case management, and other social welfare organizations and programs.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of community analysis techniques and data collection to facilitate needed services and community development. Skills to recruit, train, and develop community leadership, such as mentoring, apprenticeship, and on-the-job training. Competencies in business administration, project management, and principles and techniques of building indigenous communities and programs.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Comprehension of the power of faith-based programs. Competency in leadership and management skills, including servant and transformational leadership applied to churches, inner-city ministries, welfare service agencies, and other non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Professional ethics applied to leadership of faith-based organizations and community development. Development of a faith-based worldview and analytical paradigm of urban life.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Comprehension and application of social science theory and research methods to the socio-religious context of community development and urban ministry;
  • Ability to utilize urbanology to define and influence the role of NGOs and faith-based organizations; and
  • Preparation to develop and utilize strategies for rebuilding communities through mobilizing assets, skills, and capacities of residents, citizen associates, local institutions, and faith-based organizations.

 

SCHOOL OF MINISTRY

B.A. in Ministry, with Majors in Ministerial Studies or Theological Studies

The School of Practical Theology provides a ministerial major and a theological major—each major with a shared foundational curriculum (36 credits) and distinct career concentrations (24 credits). Completion of the foundation and a concentration satisfies the requirements of a Major in Ministerial Studies or Theological Studies.

 

The Bachelor’s Degree in Ministry gives students an advantage in pursuing career objectives in the field of ministry. The Associate’s designated courses (“†”) are designed to provide students with an entry-level vocational foundation. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment.

 

The overall learning outcome of the B.A. in Ministry is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the fields of the clergy, church education, chaplaincy, and spiritual counseling. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in pastoral services, chaplaincy, teaching, research, social work, public relations, advertising, marketing, sales, grant writing, personnel and organizational management, executive administration, entrepreneurship, personal, spiritual and familial counseling, victim advocacy and conflict mediation, and a variety of ministerial related positions typically filled by HR departments of denominational and mission organizations, faith-based social service agencies, business and corporations, military and health services chaplaincy, justice system, and non-profit or community service organizations.

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, skills and qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

MINISTRY PROGRAM (60 credits)

Credentials: The Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts

The Ministry and Theology Majors provide preparation for careers in church and para-church ministries. Specific concentrations to practical theology careers include pastoral ministry, church education, chaplaincy, and spiritual formation counseling. Students complete the General Education requirements (44 credits), the foundation requirement (36 credits), and the courses of a career concentration (24 credits). An additional 16 elective credits are required to complete a B.A. degree for a total of 120 credits.

 

During the sophomore year, Practical Theology A.A. degree-track students with an emphasis in vocational ministry must complete courses designated by “†” of the following listed courses of the Ministerial and Theological Foundation Requirement for a total of 30 credits plus 30 General Education credits for a total of 60 credits.

 

Ministerial Foundation Requirement (36 credits; A.A. required courses designated by †)

Course No. Course Title Credits
THE 201 Faith and Work † 3
THE 207 Introduction to Spiritual Formation † 3
THE 210 Introduction to the Bible 3
THE 215 Apologetics and Persuasion † 3
THE 219 Life of Christ I: Kingdom of God † 3
THE 220 Life of Christ II: Nature of Man † 3
THE 221 Life of Christ III: Redemption † 3
THE 222 Life of Christ IV: World Religion † 3
THE 241 Devotional Theology † 3
THE 251 Biblical and Religious Topics † 3
PHL 221 Critical Thinking † 3
PSY 205 Applied Psychology 3

Learning Outcomes for the ministerial and theological foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the ministerial and theological foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Ministerial Employment Opportunities. Completion of the ministerial and theological foundation requirement is preparation for employment opportunities including self-employment in a variety of enterprises and services involving professional ministry and church work, such as pastoral services, religious education, chaplaincy, spiritual counseling and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments of churches and para-ecclesiastical organizations requiring a ministerial background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, mediation, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of religious tenants, practices, counseling, and people skills related to nurturing spiritual formation, the devotional life, and the cure and care of souls. Competency in the art of persuasion, skills of biblical exegesis, and ability to integrate of faith and work.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Analytical skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making. Comprehension and application of the message, model, and methods of Jesus Christ to the ministerial profession. Soft skills, including personal traits and interpersonal relationships valued by employers and essential to successful organizations.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. A practical approach to devotional spiritual life as applied to such experiences as rejection, relationships, self-confidence, family life, life purpose, and personal traits.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Apply biblical literature in its own times, historically, and in modern culture;
  • Articulate redemptive concepts for personal, public, and corporate life; and
  • Understand human nature and apply psychological reactions to everyday life.

 

Concentration in Pastoral Ministry (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
THE 345 Oral Communication 3
THE 371 Theological Concepts of Leadership 3
THE 381 Church Development or HIS 341 History of Christianity in America 3
THE 394 Evangelism and Discipleship 3
THE 481 Cure and Care of Souls 3
HSE 429 Grief and Loss 3
PSY 245 Counseling Skills Praxis 3
PSY 461 Death and Dying 3

Learning Outcomes for the pastoral ministry concentration: As a result of successfully completing the pastoral ministry requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Pastoral Ministry Employment Opportunities. Completion of the ministerial and theological foundation and the pastoral ministry concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of religious enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments of churches and para-ecclesiastical organizations requiring a ministerial background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, mediation, human services, and non-clinical pastoral counseling or training of individuals and groups in such areas as pastoral leadership, counseling psychology, crisis intervention, individual and group maturation, pastoral care, and theological and spiritual counseling.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of church organization and competency in people and leadership skills. Communication skills in homiletic development, text exposition, and practical exhortation. Competencies of persuasion and motivation involved in the work of spiritual direction, such as evangelism and discipleship. Diagnostic skills of the spiritual condition of a soul and competencies to provide healing and nurturing.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Best practices of curing and caring for spiritual needs and the soul. Counseling skills involved in providing comfort and guidance in the areas of grief, loss, dying, and death. Ability to start, organize, and lead a new church plant.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Concepts and practices of servant leadership and church development. Comprehension of the oratory philosophy and techniques of the greatest orators of the last 100 years and application to the development and delivery of sermons.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Understand how to train leaders and the next generation of leaders;
  • Utilization of the techniques of mentoring in one-on-one relationships;
  • Understand the dynamics & techniques of leading small and large groups; and
  • Evaluation and utilization of a variety of ecclesiastical organizational paradigms and a range of Christian religious traditions and practices.

 

Concentration in Church Education (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
THE 311 Biblical Interpretation 3
THE 347 Theological Education by Extension 3
THE 348 Church School Curricula & Administration 3
THE 401 The Pentateuch I or THE 402 The Pentateuch II 3
THE 411 Letters of Paul I or THE 412 Letters of Paul II or THE 342 Christology 3
THE 431 Wisdom Literature or THE 421 Prophets of Israel 3
EDU 301 Curriculum Design, Management & Training 3
EDU 303 Teaching Techniques & Learning Environments 3

Learning Outcomes for the church education concentration: As a result of successfully completing the church education requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Church Education Employment Opportunities. Completion of the ministerial and theological foundation and the church education concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of religious enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments of churches, para-ecclesiastical organizations, and other entities requiring an educational background may involve teaching and teacher training, research and curriculum development, school and Theological Education by Extension (TEE) learning center administration, continuing and extension education, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, mediation, and human services.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge and skills of church school administration, theological education by extension, curriculum development, teaching techniques, teacher training, and learning environments.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Competencies in principles of biblical interpretation and knowledge of a broad range of biblical content. Comprehension of the dynamics and relative value of pedagogy, andragogy, and synergogy in the process of teaching and learning.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Understand the theological concepts, practical wisdom, and structured religious life of the Hebrews and the First Century church as they apply to religious education, modern life and institutions, and the seminal challenges of injustice, idolatry, and immorality.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Preparation for admission to graduate studies at many seminaries;
  • Use the tools of biblical higher criticism to identify the provenance, authorship and audience of the Pentateuch, the Prophets and Wisdom Literature of Israel, and the Pauline letters, and reflect on the relevance of these to the contemporary world and modern life; and
  • Competency to identify classical Christian theological systems compared to modern trends and themes in theology.

 

Concentration in Chaplaincy (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
THE 351 Rescue Mission Chaplaincy Practicum I 3
THE 392 Rescue Ministry 3
THE 394 Evangelism and Discipleship 3
THE 450 Rescue Mission Chaplaincy Practicum II 3
THE 481 Cure and Care of Souls 3
HSE 311 Spiritual Alliances or PSY 331 Social Psychology 3
HSE 429 Grief and Loss or PSY 461 Death and Dying 3
PSY 245 Counseling Skills Praxis or THE 431 Wisdom Literature 3

Learning Outcomes for the chaplaincy concentration: As a result of successfully completing the chaplaincy requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Chaplaincy Employment Opportunities. Completion of the ministerial and theological foundation and the chaplaincy concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of religious enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments of churches, para-ecclesiastical organizations, and other entities such as rescue missions, hospitals, rest homes and hospices requiring a ministerial background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, mediation, human services, care giving, and non-clinical pastoral counseling or training of individuals and groups in such areas as the chaplaincy, counseling psychology, crisis intervention, individual and group maturation, pastoral care, and theological and spiritual counseling.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of the mission and manner of the ministry of chaplaincy, with specific competencies related to rescue mission clientele, such as the indigent. Competencies of persuasion and motivation involved in the work of spiritual direction, such as evangelism and discipleship. Diagnostic skills of the spiritual condition of a soul and competencies to provide healing and nurturing.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Competency to identify or develop collaborative networks for the benefit of chaplaincy clientele. Best practices of curing and caring for spiritual needs and the soul. Counseling skills involved in providing comfort and guidance in the areas of grief, loss, dying, and death.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Working knowledge of professional spiritual and ministerial alliances. Growth in the capacity of wisdom—a reality-based worldview and the ability to process and practice life-knowledge to attain desired outcomes.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Qualify for admission to graduate studies at many seminaries;
  • Understand and utilize the classical techniques and disciplines of spiritual life leading to greater personal growth and design and develop a personal spiritual growth strategy;
  • Comprehend and contrast city rescue mission and other chaplaincies, specifically the application of a gospel ministry and “Tough Love” emphasis in the rescue mission context; and
  • Management skills to organize and oversee the work of the chaplaincy and, in particular, the mission chapel and preaching and teaching in the rescue mission context.

 

Concentration in Spiritual Formation Counseling (24 credits for a B.A. major)

Course No. Course Title Credits
THE 394 Evangelism and Discipleship 3
THE 396 Spiritual Formation and Nurture 3
THE 431 Wisdom Literature 3
THE 481 Cure and Care of Souls 3
HSE 223 Group Counseling Skills or PSY 245 Counseling Skills Praxis 3
HSE 246 Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing 3
HSE 429 Grief and Loss or PSY 461 Death and Dying 3
PSY 471 Psychology and Religion 3

Learning Outcomes for the spiritual counseling concentration: As a result of successfully completing the spiritual formation counseling requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Spiritual Formation Counseling Employment Opportunities. Completion of the ministerial and theological foundation and the spiritual formation counseling concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of religious enterprises and services and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments of churches and para-ecclesiastical organizations requiring a counseling background may involve teaching, research, social work, human sciences, drug and domestic counseling, victim advocacy, mediation, human services, and non-clinical spiritual counseling or training of individuals and groups in such areas as spiritual leadership, counseling psychology, crisis intervention, individual and group maturation, spiritual care of souls, and theological and spiritual counseling.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of the psycho-somatic-spiritual dynamics of religious life and practices. Individual and group counseling skills and techniques of motivational interviewing. Competencies of persuasion and motivation involved in the work of spiritual direction, such as evangelism and discipleship.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Diagnostic skills of the spiritual condition of a soul and competencies to provide healing and nurturing. Counseling skills involved in providing comfort and guidance in the areas of grief, loss, dying, and death.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Understand religious concepts, practical biblical wisdom, and structured religious life vis-à-vis human psychology, personal aspiration, and spiritual disciplines.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Ability to utilize practical common sense paradigms and principles in helping people solve everyday personal problems and circumstantial dilemmas;
  • Comprehension of various life-span passages of human development, including family life, work, success, failure, crises, loss, death and dying and competency to provide counsel and support to people as they experience them; and
  • Preparation to help people achieve spiritual vitality, psychological health, and practical wisdom in the full spectrum of a purposeful and joyful life.

  

GRADUATE SCHOOL

M.A. in Professional Studies, with Concentrations in Executive Leadership or Professional Educator

MASTER’S DEGREE (36 credits)

Credential: The Master of Arts

Consistent with a University education and graduate-level studies, the Master of Arts is designed to provide an integration and synthesis of breadth studies (through an interdisciplinary foundation) and depth studies (through professional concentrations).

 

A Master’s level interdisciplinary foundational requirement and a field-related professional concentration prepare students for career development, professional advancement, and community and organizational leadership. Students complete the foundational requirement (15 credits) and an elective professional concentration (21 credits, including a capstone thesis) in leadership or education. The capstone thesis requires an integration and synthesis of graduate-level foundational leadership, ethics, consequential ideas, analysis, and research methods with a professional concentration. Completion of the foundation, a concentration, and a capstone thesis satisfies the requirements of the Master of Arts.

 

The Master’s Degree gives students an advantage in pursuing vocational and career objectives. The University endeavors to assist students in job placement, but there is no guarantee of employment.

 

The overall learning outcome of the M.A. in Professional Studies is for graduates to achieve regular first-time employment or self-employment or career advancement in the field of executive leadership or professional educator. Such employment or career advancement includes career opportunities in market research, advertising, marketing, grant writing, personnel management and organizational psychology and management, executive leadership, public administration, project management, conflict mediation, and a variety of leadership, domestic counseling, and education related employment positions typically filled by HR departments of service agencies, government, business, corporate, and non-profit or community service organizations.

 

Specific learning outcomes of the program include technical information and skills for employment, skills and qualifications necessary for advancement, and personal enrichment in the field.

 

Master’s Degree Graduation Requirements

  1. One year of residency with no fewer than 30 credits taken at American Concentrations University.
  2. Recommendation of the faculty.
  3. Formal and timely application for graduation.
  4. No outstanding financial obligations to the university.
  5. Completion of a minimum of 36 semester credits of the Master’s requirements: the M.A core curriculum (15 credits) and the professional concentration (21 credits).
  6. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher.

 

M.A. in Professional Studies Foundation Requirement (15 credits)

Course No. Course Title Credits
GNS 501 Professional Ethics 3
GNS 511 Consequential Ideas and Socio-Political Systems 3
GNS 521 Analytical Thinking and Methods 3
GNS 531 Professional Leadership 3
GNS 541 Research and Analysis 3
GNS 590 Master’s Capstone Thesis (see specific concentration)

Foundation courses are team-taught by the faculty of the M.A. concentrations in leadership and education.

Learning Outcomes for the Master’s Degree foundation requirement: As a result of successfully completing the foundational requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Professional Studies Employment Opportunities. Completion of the professional studies foundation requirement is preparation for employment opportunities including self-employment and employment or professional advancement positions that may be offered by HR departments in executive leadership or professional educator as delineated by the following corresponding concentrations.
  • Information and Skills. Competencies in professional leadership, ethics, and research relative to the following enhanced capabilities:
  • Thinking—the ability to use knowledge acquisition, cultural literacy, and logical and critical thinking skills to acquire information in a field of study, social ethics, and leadership principles and skills applicable to successful careers and functional communities;
  • Doing—the ability to use leadership techniques and marketable skills in the community and career pursuits conducive to financial responsibility and self-reliance; and
  • Being—the ability to personal growth, values and integrity in problem solving and decision-making in areas such as sanctity of life, human rights, civic participation, an social justice.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Enhanced analytical skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making. Advanced soft skills valued by employers and essential to a successful organization, such as personal traits (e.g., habits, integrity, dependability, conscientiousness) and interpersonal relationships (e.g., communication, interpersonal skills, teamwork, managing people, leadership).
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Working knowledge of socio-economic-political systems, consequential ideas, and eventful leadership examples and models of the Western Intellectual and American Democratic Traditions.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Integration and synthesis of graduate-level interdisciplinary foundational professional studies in leadership, ethics, consequential ideas, analysis, and research methods with a specific professional concentration in executive leadership or professional educator;
  • Enhanced cognitive, effective, and affective skills that promote successful lives, ethical conduct, civic responsibility, and functional communities;
  • Competencies in synthesizing the past, present, and future in order to move from the immediate to the timeless and the individual to the universal; and
  • Comprehension of contemporary personal morality and social justice issues and consequences relative to the Judeo-Christian Tradition, Greek and Renaissance Humanism, American democratic exceptionalism, conservatism and liberalism, socio-economic-political paradigms of capitalism, socialism and communism, modern psychology, and the Scientific Method.

 

Concentration in Executive Leadership (21 credits for an M.A. concentration)

Course No. Course Title Credits
IDS 510 Controversies in Technology, Ethics and Management 3
IDS 521 Leadership and Management Systems 3
IDS 522 Leadership and Management Scope 3
IDS 523 Leadership and Management for a Globalizing World 3
IDS 531 Sociological and Psychological Perspectives 3
IDS 541 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3
GNS 590 Capstone Thesis: Leadership (concentration synthesis of foundation) 3

Learning Outcomes for the executive leadership concentration: As a result of successfully completing the leadership concentration requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Executive Leadership Employment Opportunities. Completion of the professional studies foundation requirement and the executive leadership concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of management enterprises, services, and consultations and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments requiring an executive management and leadership background may involve CEO and vice presidential management in advanced market research, advertising and marketing, personnel recruitment, training and evaluation, employment agreements, benefits and management, workforce motivation, productivity, mediation and conflict resolution, industrial organization, psychology and consultation, public administration and, public relations.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of how science and technology drive managerial, commercial, and ethical considerations of executive leadership. Advanced leadership skills involving project scope, planning, cost, risk, human relations, communication, and management.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Comprehension and utilization by executive leadership of sociological method, psychological motifs, and bureaucratic management. Techniques of the marketplace, democratic institutions, and management for dealing with controversial issues. Advance management skills in industrial, organizational, and project systems, scope, and globalization.
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Management best practices. Leadership perspectives and applications of consequential ideas and modern world movements, including the sociological paradigms of Peter Berger, Emil Durkheim, Max Weber, Robert Merton, and William Julius Wilson.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Integration and synthesis of the professional concentration of executive leadership with graduate-level interdisciplinary foundational professional studies in leadership, ethics, consequential ideas, analysis, and research methods;
  • Preparation for testing for Certified Associate in Project Management and Project Management Professional certification;
  • Comprehend how employee behaviors and attitudes can be improved through the power of motivating and inspiriting ideas, hiring practices, training programs, and feedback;
  • Comprehend how management systems can assist organizational systems during periods of change, development, and expansion to achieve positive outcomes; and
  • Competency in designing discrete and comprehensive industrial and organizational outcomes, quantitative and qualitative product and services evaluation standards, and personnel and market assessment surveys, protocols, procedures and tools.

 

Concentration in Professional Educator (21 credits an M.A. concentration)

Course No. Course Title Credits
EDU 501 Classroom Environments and School Culture 3
EDU 502 Relational Dynamics and Communication 3
EDU 503 Cultural Awareness and Understanding 3
EDU 504 Methods in Education I: Learning Outcomes, Standards, and Assessment 3
EDU 505 Methods in Education II: Student-Centered Learning & Instrctnl Methods 3
EDU 506 Methods in Education III: Differentiated & Responsive Instruction 3
GNS 590 Capstone Thesis: Education (concentration synthesis of foundation) 3

Learning Outcomes for the professional educator concentration: As a result of successfully completing the professional educator concentration requirement, including field information and skills, advancement skills and qualifications and personal enrichment, the student will be able to:

  • Professional Educator Employment Opportunities. Completion of the professional studies foundation requirement and the professional educator concentration prepares graduates for self-employment in a variety of education enterprises, services, and consultation specializing in K-12, government, and corporate educational programs and employment or professional advancement in positions that may be offered by HR departments and alternative education programs, such as the schools of the national StreetSchool NetworkTM, requiring a professional educator background may involve teaching students, personnel training, curriculum and learning and training materials development, educational administration including management, principal and office staff, and leadership of at-risk youth educational programs.
  • Information and Skills. Working knowledge of research-based and proven educational strategies, standards, methodology, assessment, and outcomes for educating all learners and especially students of at-risk environments. Competency in skills and techniques of student-center learning, instructional methods, including differentiated and responsive instruction, and learning environment management.
  • Advancement Skills and Qualifications. Comprehension of and competencies in educational rigor, personal/social/academic development, career preparation, and ethical/spiritual/character development. A spectrum of competencies, techniques, and resources for teaching at-risk learners and training corporate personnel. Competency in techniques to provide encouragement and positive reinforcement for insecure, reluctant, and struggling learners
  • Personal Enrichment in Field. Educational instruction and management best practices for the corporate world, public and private education, and diverse cultural/social/economic environments. An appreciation for specific factors and dynamics that impact the educational achievement of all learners, and especially of at-risk learners.
  • Other Field Related Outcomes. In addition to the preceding depth preparation in the field, this program provides breadth preparation as follows:
  • Integration and synthesis of the professional concentration of professional educator with graduate-level interdisciplinary foundational professional studies in leadership, ethics, consequential ideas, analysis, and research methods;
  • Competency in communication, motivation methods, and instructional techniques; and
  • Methods of incorporating the liberating arts (social and natural sciences and the humanities) while teaching learners in urban, suburban, inner city, and corporate contexts in order to develop well-rounded competence and confidence, individual initiative, and self-reliance.

 

OTHER EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

MINORS AND SPECIALIZATIONS

B.A. Minor in Practical Theology (18 credits)

B.A. students majoring in business, human services, or leadership & management may add a minor in practical theology. Learning outcomes may be found in the core requirements of the Practical Theology Cluster.

 

Course No. Course Title Credits
THE 320 Prologue to the Life of Christ: Incarnation (or HIS 121) 3
THE 321 Challenges to the Life of Christ: Incarnation (or PHL 211) 3
THE 325 Life of Christ I: Kingdom of God 3
THE 326 Life of Christ II: Nature of Man 3
THE 330 Life of Christ III: Redemption 3
THE 331 Life of Christ IV: World Religion 3

 

B.A. Minor in Psychology (18 credits)

B.A. students majoring in business, human services, leadership & management, or practical theology may add an applied psychology enhancement by completing the following courses for a minor in psychology. PSY 221 General Psychology is prerequisite to a psychology minor.

 

Course No. Course Title Credits
PSY 315 Cognitive Psychology (Age Specific) 3
PSY 311 Age Specific Developmental Psychology (Child & Adolescent) 3
PSY 321 Life Span Developmental Psychology 3
PSY 331 Social Psychology 3
PSY 341 Tests and Measurements (Experimental Psychology) 3
PSY 421 Abnormal Psychology 3

 

B.A. Minor in Urban Studies (18 credits)

B.A. students majoring in business, human services, or practical theology may add an urban studies enhancement by completing the following courses for a minor in urban studies. Learning outcomes may be found in the core requirements of the Management and Leadership Cluster.

 

Course No. Course Title Credits
LDR 321 The City: Context for Change 3
LDR 331 Community and Social Analysis 3
LDR 411 Building Indigenous Communities 3
LDR 463 Power and Powerlessness 3
LDR 471 Urban World and Globalism 3
PHL 231 Ethics in the Urban World 3

 

A.A. Emphases (30 credits)

Students must select one of the major fields of study for emphasizes in a vocational emphasis. Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits in such an emphasis in order to satisfy the A.A. Degree requirement. Courses listed in the major field foundational requirement and career pathway that are designated by “†” are required. A.A. students should consult with the Director of the department of his/her interest or the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

The following certificates are awarded by the organizations specified upon completion of APU courses.

Project Management Diploma (PMD)

Awarded to students who complete BUS 381, BUS 395, BUS 396, BUS 481, BUS 491, and one of the following: BUS 391, BUS 397, or LDR 302. While there is no guarantee of success, these courses prepare students to sit for the PMI Global certification tests for either PMP® or CAPM®. Certification at the highest level of a Profession’s Standards shows the Global Marketplace you are ready to perform using the International Standards set by the Industry.

Diploma of Practical Theology (DPT)

Awarded by an international agency, Missions Door, to students who complete THE 317 (or HIS 121), THE 318 (or PHL 211), THE 319, THE 320, THE 321, and THE 331.

Diploma of Biblical Theology (DBT)

Awarded by an international agency, Missions Door, to students who complete THE 401, THE 402, THE 411, THE 412, THE 421, and THE 431.

Inner-City Ministry Chaplaincy Certification Program (RMCC)

Awarded by the Center for Mission Studies of the Denver Rescue Mission to students who complete THE 350, THE 351, THE 450, which also may be applied to completion of the B.A. Chaplaincy concentration.

New Life Sociology Certificates (NLC)

Awarded by the Denver Rescue Mission to students who complete SOC 151 and SOC 152 for NLC I and SOC 251, SOC 252, and SOC 253 for NLC II

COLLEGE PREPARATION PROGRAMS

Post-Secondary Education Option (PSEO)

Qualified high school juniors and seniors may register for APU courses for credit.

Adult Literacy Program

Adult literacy program information is available though the University’s Department of General Education and Adult Learning.

GED High School Equivalency Certificate Preparation Program

For students without a high school diploma who seek admission to the University, APU offers a program of study preparing them to take the GED. Students enroll in EDU 100 General Educational Development (3 credits) to prepare for the GED test. This course is also available for other students seeking to broaden their knowledge.

 

The General Education Development (GED) tests are a series of examinations that are designed to determine whether the person taking them has the literacy and computational skills equivalent to those of the upper-two thirds of the students currently graduating from high schools in the United States. The GED tests measure broad concepts and general knowledge, not how well the students remember details, precise definitions, or historical facts. Thus, the tests do not penalize candidates who lack recent academic or classroom experience or who have acquired their education informally.

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

Central America

 Academic credit (3-6 credits) is available through the Central America Field Studies (STA 201) course. For more information, see the Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Study Abroad Program Director.

 Europe

 Issues of cultural adaptation are encountered in the context of a multicultural team working with gypsy orphans in Romania. Emphasis is on becoming a language and culture learner and identifying key cultural elements. Academic credit is awarded as STA 202 Cross-Cultural Adaptation (3-6 credits). For more information, see the Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Study Abroad Program Director.

Africa

 Issues of cultural adaptation are encountered in the context of a multicultural team working with HIV orphans in Kenya and Zimbabwe; emphasis is on becoming a language- and culture-learner and identifying key cultural elements. Academic credit is awarded as STA 203 Cross-Cultural Adaptation (3-6 credits). For more information, see the Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Study Abroad Program Director.

Women of the World

Focus on first-hand cross-cultural adaptation by first world women relative to second & third world women of Africa, Romania, or Armenia emphasizing being a language/culture-learner, identifying key cultural elements, promoting human rights, developing resources, and building cultural bridges & infrastructure. Academic credit is awarded as STA 204-206 Cross-Cultural Adaptation (3-9 credits). For more information, see the Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Study Abroad Program Director.

American Pathways Univeristy