American Pathways Univeristy

Course Descriptions

 

EXPLANATION OF COURSE NUMBERS AND CREDITS

Course credits are denoted in parenthesis; e.g., (3) denotes 3 credits.

Generally, courses are numbered in the following manner:

  • Courses numbered 100-200 Freshman and sophomore* courses
  • Courses numbered 300-400 Reserved to Junior and Senior students
  • Courses numbered 500-599 Master’s level courses
  • Courses numbered 250-255, 350-355, 450-455 Denote practicum courses and internships
  • Courses numbered sequentially (e.g., 351, 352, 353) Denote a series of related courses (usually not

required to be taken consecutively)

*Approved degree-track Sophomore students may enroll in up to 30 credits of 300-level courses.

Course designations are denoted as follows:

•BUS  –– Business

•CAP  –– Computer Applications

•ECO  –– Economics

•EDU  –– Education

•ENG  –– English

•FST   –– Family Systems Therapy

•FNA  –– Fine Arts

•GNS  –– General Studies

•HIS    –– History

•HSE   –– Human Services

•HUM –– Humanities

•IDS    –– Interdisciplinary Studies

•LAN  –– Language

•LDR  –– Leadership

•LIT    –– Literature

•MAT –– Mathematics

•MUS –– Music

•PHL  –– Philosophy

•POL  –– Political Science

•PSY  –– Psychology

•SCI   –– Science

•SOC  –– Sociology

•SPE   –– Speech

•STA  –– Study Abroad

•THE  –– Theology

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course Descriptions Available on the University Website

Course descriptions are available on-line at the University website (americanpathways.edu). They are also included in the syllabus for each course.

BUSINESS (BUS)

BUS 101 Introduction to Business (3)

Business Knowledge has radically changed business systems, organization structures and processes. This course introduces students to modern strategy and tactical tools used in business today.

BUS 201 Group and Organizational Dynamics (3)

How group behavior affects organizational effectiveness, decision-making, and group conflicts; strategies for efficient group and task management.

BUS 202 Leadership and Management (3)

Motivational theory related to individual and group functions; functional and dysfunctional leadership styles; synthesis of those functional styles that work best to create the ultimate style.

BUS 212 Business and Interpersonal Skills (3)

Business enterprise: customer expectations, time management, negotiating skills, workplace coaching, conflict resolution, listening & communication skills, problem solving, team leading, decision-making.

BUS 221 Decision Making and Problem Solving (3)

Basic skills of evaluation and analysis, critical thinking, problem solving strategies, creativity, decision-making, and communication, with applications to business and management.

BUS 241 Financial Management (3)

Budgeting, financial planning, controlling financial performance, evaluating capital investments, and managing risk in capital budgeting.

BUS 243 Accounting Systems (3)

Accounting uses inputs and produces outputs that help management, suppliers and government assess the health of a company. This course introduces the history, why and how current accounting systems exist and introduces debits and credits using accounting systems.

BUS 244 Finance Systems (3)

Financial systems help track and communicate information for key Business Leaders to make decisions with. Selecting the type of structure and knowing how to read the information is key to good decisions.

BUS 281 Project Management Systems (3)

Basics of Project Management, utilizing the Project Management Body of Knowledge (detailed by the Project Management Institute); preparation for testing for “Certified Associate in Project Management.”

BUS 285 Business Law (3)

Business Law forms a foundation for doing business and sets expectations and rules for all parties adherence. Beginning with Contract Law, an analysis of how business law affects business decisions.

BUS 311 Interpersonal Relations and Dynamics (3)

Healthy work relationships, effective verbal/nonverbal communication/feedback, and conflict resolution.

BUS 331 Human Resources Management (3)

HR planning, recruitment, and staffing: Federal employment guidelines & Colorado law, performance management & development, compensation & benefits, employee relations; tracking systems.

BUS 335 Introduction to Real Estate (3)

Real Estate as an economic good, the bundle of property rights, the transaction process in real estate and liquidity, valuation of real estate interests, highest and best use, feasibility analysis, tax considerations in real estate investment, optimal leveraging strategies, institutional real estate investment and portfolio considerations, securitized and structured real estate interests, investment performance of alternative property classes, the role of the developer, public sector involvement in the real estate market, corporate real estate asset management, and the future of real estate. A hands-on approach to analysis of real estate deal opportunities and case presentations by several members of the real estate professional community.

BUS 342 Business Accounting (3)

Fundamentals of accounting for business: recording & communicating, issues of cost & short-term decisions, the expenditure cycle, the revenue cycle, the conversion cycle, the cash cycle.

BUS 345 Business Information Systems (3)

Selection and Application of Technology to a Business Venture is very important.  Culture, location and financial abilities will dictate which technology will be best for each business. This class helps the students understand what is available and how each piece might add the greatest value to different types of business. Data storage, analysis tools and business automation will be researched and used in class.

BUS 351 Business Incubator Laboratory I (3)

Field experience in starting and running a small business: meetings with the Local Business Incubator and evaluation of essential requirements of a startup business by donation of 12 hours of professional work.

BUS 361 Business Planning (3)

Preparation of a business plan, using market research and organizational science, for a start-up business or for an existing enterprise––use of software that evaluates financial competitive activity and social issues.

BUS 362 Logistics Management (3)

Logistics involves physical flow of materials, final goods and related information from origin to consumption to meet customer requirements.

BUS 371 Entrepreneurship (3)

Entrepreneurial creation and expansion of the enterprise: organization, management, responsibility, resources, market research, stocks, innovation, and case studies of the great entrepreneurs of history.

BUS 375 Brand Creation and Management (3)

Brand Management: tangible/intangible characteristics of a business – tangibles like product quality or technology and intangibles like customer experience and satisfaction will be researched and understood.

BUS 376 Designing Business Presentations (3)

Communication to Customers, Executives, Suppliers and the Team is a Key to strong business success.  How you put the information needed together is a key to their understanding. This course will introduce existing and new tools to communicate and have the students use these tools in Business settings.

BUS 377 Marketing Strategies and Social Networking (3)

Different business models require a variety of Marketing Strategies. Strategies selection requires primary and secondary research on the target markets. Students should understand how and where to find this data and compile it for business use. Marketing strategy utilizing the newest social networking available through e-mail, electronic brochures, Facebook and Twitter tools available for little or no cost.

BUS 391 Project Management Scope (3)

Development of clear “scope statements” for discovery and documentation of agreements for executive management: project management, financial & risk planning, communication planning, HR planning.

BUS 395 Project Time and Schedule Management (3)

Developing a Project Plan into an Operating Time Table. Developing a Work Breakdown Structure, Sequencing the Activities and understanding their dependencies and the Critical Path of the Project Plan.

BUS 396 Project Cost Management (3)

Estimating Costs by Activity in a Project and developing them into a Time Phased Budget. Learning about Earned Value formulas and using them for Project Tracking Forecasting and Reporting.

BUS 397 Project Human Resources and Communications Management (3)

Developing a Human Resource Strategy that integrates the needs of your Project and then Implementing the Planning, Hiring, Training and Executing of a Project or Endeavor.

BUS 411 Systems Management (3)

Evaluation of organizations using a systems model: analysis of solving organizational problems, with application to work-related issues and projects in business and community.

BUS 412 Information Systems Management (3)

Information Systems has a changing role in Business Strategy. Identifying the characteristics of useful Information and how to store data and mine this data for Business uses.

BUS 421 Leadership and Management Plan (3)

Using theories of management and leadership, research and organizational science, and observation to develop a management and leadership system for start-up businesses or for existing enterprises.

BUS 431 Small Business Administration (3)

Characteristics and problems of a small business; how to establish and operate a small business; how management structures can reflect Christian values.

BUS 441 Nonprofit Business Administration (3)

Fund raising & contributions; accounting & financial reporting; nonprofit sector policies and procedures; state and Federal employment guidelines; benefit regulations and compliances; tracking systems.

BUS 451 Business Incubator Laboratory II (3)

Field experience in an entrepreneurial situation in a small, mid-sized or mega-business under the mentorship of practitioners in the field.

BUS 452 Management Field Project (3)

Field experience in a managerial situation in a small, mid-sized, or mega-business under the mentorship of practitioners in the field; 50 field experience hours are required.

BUS 453 Entrepreneurship Field Project (3)

Starting and running a small business––a class project application to the Local Business Incubator for a startup business: business plan, risk assessment, legal review, financial review, and stakeholder review.

BUS 454 Project Management Field Project (3)

Business internship: implement all 10 Knowledge Areas from PMI® PMBOK into a current business.

BUS 481 Project Risk Management (3)

Principles and methods of identifying, assessing and managing risks in projects and business venues.

BUS 485 Project Procurement Management (3)

Negotiation and Purchasing from External or Internal organizations is a key to the success of all projects. Selecting Vendors, understanding the Logistics and Performance Reviews with the Vendors is taught.

BUS 489 Empowering People (3)

People are every organizations most important asset.  Empowering people to make great decisions makes an organization more effective. This course uses proven strategies to build up people to make them capable and willing to make good decisions.

BUS 491 Advanced Project Management (3)

Advanced analysis of scope, risk, cost, HR, communication, time, quality, procurement, integration management, and professional responsibility in preparation for Project Management Professional certification. Certification at the highest level of a Profession’s Standards shows the Global Marketplace you are ready to perform using the International Standards set by the Industry. While there is no guarantee, this capstone course prepares a student for certification by the Project Management Institute. PMI offers the Project Management Professional (PMP®) or Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM®). The course reviews past learning in preparation to sit for PMI Globally recognized Certifications by teaching and testing learning using practice testing software.

BUS 493 Legal Issues in Business Planning (3)

Legal requirements and resources in planning for insurance needs, zoning, contracting, and labor laws.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (CAP)

CAP 101 Basic Computing (3)

Basic computing concepts, processes, terminology, computer systems & hardware, software applications, and personal computing platforms for home, finance, business administration, and entrepreneurial careers.

CAP 301 CAD Applications (3)

Using CAD (Computer-Aided Design) on the personal computer, with specialized state-of-the-art software in industrial design ranging from buildings to equipment.

CAP 311 Video Digitizing (3)

Converting pictures or drawings into digital code so that it can be reproduced on a computer screen including storing video images and displaying them fast enough to indicate movement.

CAP 315 Computer Applications in Business (3)

Practical applications in business and management: word processing, spreadsheet & database management, desktop publishing, communications (email, e-commerce, Internet and World Wide Web).

CAP 321 Internet Connectivity Applications (3)

Introduction to the “Information Superhighway,” with a focus on internet connectivity, email, ftp (Internet File Transfer System Program), telnet, the World Wide Web, the USENET.

CAP 331 Website Design and Management (3)

Essentials of Website design and management.

CAP 341 Programming Applications (3)

Programming concepts and techniques, with applications for a variety of settings.

CAP 411 Harnessing the Web for Business (3)

The WEB is becoming the great equalizer and allows business to have explosive growth. Google, Amazon, e-Bay, Craigslist and Facebook are examples of very successful use of the Web.  For each of these there are thousands of examples of failure too.  This class looks at both success and failures to understand how the Web can be a valuable tool.

CAP 412 Data Mining for Business (3)

Predictive Analytics or Data Mining has always been done by successful businesses that assess future needs and how to fill them. Today Information Systems can super charge and give support to mental Exercises from the past.  This course combines both to more effectively grow knowledge to create business or personal expansion.

ECONOMICS (ECO)

ECO 201 Introduction to Economics (3)

Supply & demand, consumer utility, production & costs, competition & monopoly, resource allocation, public goods, income distribution & economic regulation, urban economics, social responsibility & ethics.

EDUCATION (EDU)

EDU 201 Introduction to Education (3)

Survey of American higher education, learning and teaching models, pedagogy and andragogy, testing and assessment, and directed study, mentored and guided development.

EDU 203 Effective Teaching and Classroom Management (1)

The characteristics of an effective teacher, well-managed classroom including developing a discipline plan, implementing classroom procedures, designing lessons for student mastery.

EDU 221 Principles and Methods of Teaching (3-4)

Survey of curriculum design with emphasis on formulating objectives, reaching different learning styles, evaluation procedures, and mastering effective teaching techniques. Principles reinforced through teaching the classroom at the secondary level.

EDU 251, 252, 253 Cooperative Education I, II, III (3, 3, 3)

College-equivalent fieldwork: professional assignment with a business, government agency, or nonprofit organization––earns 3 credits per 100 hours of work and a maximum of three fieldwork assignments.

EDU 301 Curriculum Design, Management & Training (3)

Curriculum design (with emphasis on objectives, learning styles, outcomes and assessment), program management, and teacher training programs.

EDU 303 Teaching Techniques & Learning Environments (3)

Techniques and characteristics of effective teaching and learning environments, including classroom management, lessons plans, technology, and methods.

EDU 501 Classroom Environments & School Culture (3)

Principles, policies, procedures, and strategies for establishing a climate for success within the urban classroom, with the goal of the educator being breaking through negative perceptions and feelings and inspiring students to believe in themselves and engage in learning. Students will learn strategies ranging from developing an effective and welcoming physical classroom environment to establishing boundaries within the classroom, while inspiring students to learn and achieve. Students will develop a comprehensive plan for establishing a climate of support and success within their classrooms.

EDU 502 Relational Dynamics & Communication (3)

Theories, strategies, and models for communicating with students in order to manage student behavior, developing effective conflict management, promoting student/teacher relationships, and encouraging the development of positive self-esteem. Praxis is considered for implementing such skills in the classroom environment and in student-teacher communication.

EDU 503 Cultural Awareness & Understanding (3)

Understanding cultural differences, at-risk environments, and impoverished communities and developing strategies for scaffolding instruction for all learners, break through prejudices, and establishing a supportive and inclusive school culture.

EDU 504 Methods in Education I: Learning Outcomes, Standards, and Assessment (3)

Methods of developing instruction driven by standards, course content, and student understanding through learning goals and plans, essential understandings, and assessments that show evidence of authentic learning, which will be further used to drive instruction and develop effective unit and lesson plans.

EDU 505 Methods in Education II: Student-Centered Learning & Instructional Methods (3)

Researched and proven strategies for fostering learning through engaging and meaningful experiences; structures and best practices of inquiry-based, project-centered, and cooperative learning models for students, where students are at center stage and play a critical role in the instruction, discussion, and collaboration within the classroom; unit and lesson planning directly derived from state standards, desired learning outcomes, and evidence from assessment; developing meaningful and purposeful learning experiences that engage the learner in exploration, cooperation, and inquiry; use of information technology teaching tools by teachers in the classroom to excite and enhance learning.

EDU 506 Methods in Education III: Differentiated & Responsive Instruction (3)

Sound pedagogy for meeting the needs of each student within the classroom, including those with special needs, those who are English language learners, and those with varying learning styles and intellectual abilities; learning to evaluate and recognize students who require differentiation and to respond with effective and meaningful instruction for each student within the classroom.

EDU 507 Advocacy & Student Support (3)

Enhanced understanding of the needs of urban youth and the role of the educator in reaching and teaching each student; proven methodologies for influencing and encouraging students who may see little future for themselves in school or in life, including such critical elements of student advocacy and transformational support as mentorship, accountability, and relationship building; develop a future focus with students and establish college, training, and career plans to inspire and support students in believing in their own abilities and future.

EDU 550 Practicum in Education I (3)

Supervised and mentored field experience in elementary, secondary, and college education contexts.

EDU 551 Practicum in Education II (3)

Advanced supervised/mentored field experience in elementary, secondary, and college education contexts.

ENGLISH (ENG)

ENG 099 Developmental Writing Skills (3)

Basic grammar & writing skills: sentence, paragraph & essay structure. Does not count toward graduation.

ENG 101 English Composition I (3)

Effective communication through rhetoric, argumentation, vocabulary, and intensive writing projects, utilizing English grammar, correct English usage, sentences, parts of speech, tense, punctuation and capitalization. Prerequisite: Meet placement criteria or ENG 099.

ENG 102 English Composition II (3)

Sequential course to provide intensive consideration of essay development and to introduce procedures and techniques in preparing the referenced paper. Prerequisite: ENG 101.

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric (3)

Analysis of selected speeches and writing for effective oral communication, with demonstration of delivery of the written word.

FAMILY SYSTEMS THERAPY (FST)

FST 501 Marriage and Family Systems I (3)

Analysis of the cybernetics of marriage and family systems for the purpose of therapeutic interventions including counseling, therapy, or education. It provides a general theoretical construct of Family Systems.

FST 502 Family Systems II: Addicted Family System (3)

Introduction and analysis of the cybernetics of addiction, particularly how families adjust to and often perpetrate and reinforce an addicted family system, even when the victim (AOD) has transformed.  Students learn how to facilitate assessment, planning, and intervention for these families.

FST 503 Family Systems III: Domestic Violence (3)

Analysis of the cybernetics of domestic violence and abuse, including a wide variety of predicaments of misapplied power, dominance, and control of parenting. Given the concept of the “Dance of Domestic Violence,” approaches are considered for holistic intervention of the perpetrator and victims in the system.

FST 504 Family Therapy I: Best Practice Theory (3)

Introduction to the background and thought that informs the variety of marriage and family concepts.  Students learn origins, role of the therapist, and goal of intervention for marriage and family practices.

FST 505 Family Therapy II: Best Practice Techniques (3)

Identify and analyze best practices techniques for a variety of approaches to marriage and family intervention. Students learn to identify their most effective techniques based on student orientation as well as family systemic insights.

FST 506 Family Therapy III: Best Practices Culturally (3)

Develop capacity to recognize and accurately apply MFT techniques and culturally informed dynamics for all family level interventions. Students develop multicultural competence that enables the application of family centered approaches as the family system is recognized as unique to its various family members.

FST 507 Human Development: A Theoretical Construct (3)

A comparative analysis of theories and best practices in this field. Each student is expected to recognize and delineate the theories that inform each practice, including the individual theorist.

FINE ARTS (FNA)

FNA 201 Music Appreciation (3)

Music forms, terms & compositions: e.g., Classical, Modern, Jazz, Gospel, Popular, Rock, Hip-Hop, Rap.

FNA 208 Film Appreciation (3)

Review of classic and contemporary film, with emphasis on understanding the structure and themes of film as the 20th Century’s greatest contribution to the arts.

GENERAL STUDIES (GNS)

GNS 501 Professional Ethics (3)

The relationship of moral and ethical principles to the broader professional framework in which they occur. Students will apply ethical principles to specific moral issues of the workplace and community such as social justice, business ethics, health care, war, sexuality, abortion, passive and active euthanasia.

GNS 511 Consequential Ideas and Socio-Political Systems (3)

The great formative ideas and their socio-political consequences, including the Judeo-Christian Tradition, Greek Humanism (Socrates, Plato, Aristotle), Renaissance Humanism (Petrarch), the Scientific Method and Revolution, Liberalism (John Stuart Mill, On Liberty, The Subjugation of Women), Conservatism (Edmund Burke), American Democratic tradition (John Locke, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexis De Tocqueville, Fredrick Douglass, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Abraham Lincoln, William James, Martin Luther King, Jr.), Socialism and Capitalism (Karl Marx, Vaclav Havel, Paul Johnson), and the psychology revolution (Plato, William Wendt, Sigmund Freud, William James).

GNS 521 Analytical Thinking and Methods (3)

Classical epistemologies and anti-epistemologies—empiricism, rationalism, analytic philosophy and linguistic analysis, revelation, skepticism, postmodernism—in the social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences; focus on the Socratic Method, logic, critical thinking, and the scientific method (natural and social sciences). Explore key theories, including induction and deduction (Aristotle), sociological method (Robert K. Merton), argumentation paradigm (Stephen Toulman), scientific method (Albert Einstein), revelatory-rationalist method (Saint Paul, C. S. Lewis); statistical method (Blaise Pascal, Rodney Stark); integrationist method (Thomas Aquinas); natural law (James Q. Wilson, The Moral Sense).

GNS 531 Professional Leadership (3)

Forms of social and professional leadership in their historical, literary, and philosophical context, such as the European Renaissance of the 14th through early 21st centuries, with focus on Plato, Machiavelli, Sidney Hook, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln; Billy Graham; John Paul II; Franklin D. Roosevelt; Martin Luther King, Jr., Ronald Reagan; Ken Blanchard, and Saul Alinsky.

GNS 541 Research and Analysis (3)

The nature of the scientific method and basic techniques in social science research as applied to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of social, economic, and management data. Research designs and methodologies, and analysis of existing research toward professional applications. Research methodologies include action research, thought experiments, statistical research, qualitative research, quantitative research, historiography, and literary analysis.

GNS 590 Master’s Capstone Thesis (3)

The Capstone Thesis is a research narrative (75-100 pages) evolving from M.P.S. foundational core courses and elective concentration courses. The thesis is a concentration-specific consideration in professional domains (education, marriage & family therapy, and leadership). The thesis must be approved and written under the guidance of a faculty advisor and an M.P.S. cohort peer-review. The draft thesis must be presented to a review panel of faculty, concentration-specific professionals, and students before submission of the Thesis in partial fulfillment of the core requirements of the M.P.S.

HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION (HIS)

HIS 121 Survey Of Western Civilization I (3)

Examines the origins of the institutions and beliefs of western civilization: traces their development by Greece & Rome and their preservation and enhancement in the early medieval period of European history. This course must be completed at APU.

HIS 131 Survey Of Western Civilization II (3)

The transition of European society from medieval times through the Renaissance to the modern era, noting the profound economic, social and political changes in cultural, political and intellectual revolutions.

HIS 221 American/U.S. History To 1865 (3)

Survey of American history from its European beginnings to the Civil War, providing description and analysis of the major development of politics, economics, society, and foreign policy.

HIS 231 American/U.S. History Since 1865 (3)

Survey of American history from the Civil War to modern times: analysis of the development of politics, economics, society, & foreign policy and the people & forces that shaped the American experience.

HIS 241 Colorado History (3)

The discovery, growth, and development of Colorado from the Indian occupation to the present, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the immigration of various ethnicities, exploration, trapping, mining, agriculture, and industrialization, pioneer life, labor movements, and political history.

HIS 321 History of Christianity To 1564 (3)

From the Apostolic Age to the Protestant Reformation: focus on major personalities, major theological and organizational traditions––including Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and major Protestant traditions that emerged in the sixteenth century––Lutheran, Anglican, Reformed, and Anabaptist.

HIS 331 History of Christianity Since 1564 (3)

From the Protestant Reformation to the 21st Century: focus on major personalities and major theological and organizational traditions––including Evangelicalism, Protestant liberalism, Neo-Orthodoxy, Post-Modernism, evangelism and world missions.

HIS 341 History of Christianity in America (3)

Christian experience in America from the Colonial era to the present––including leaders, theology, and polity among the major denominations––and the influence of theological ideas on social and public policy.

HUMAN SERVICES (HSE)

HSE 203 Counseling Skills (3)

Fundamentals of counseling skills. Introduction to the counseling approaches of Family Systems Therapy, Reality Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Carl Rogers, Viktor Frankl, Alfred Adler, and Sigmund Freud.

HSE 204 Counseling the Substance Abuser (3)

This course is specifically oriented to assessing and counseling the addicted client. Course work is designed to provide the trainee with knowledge of and experience in applying the fundamentals of research, evidence-based treatment, client assessment, treatment planning, client records, and individual counseling skills. Completion of this course satisfies CAC I certification requirements in addiction counseling skills and in client record management, as well as domestic violence counseling.

HSE 220 Multicultural Issues and Variables in Treatment (3)

Students develop awareness and appreciation of cultural diversity and the effects of historical oppression of African, Asian, European, Hispanic, and Native people.  This course examines the spectrum of culturally informed treatment and resistive clients, with an emphasis on the impact and identification of diverse cultural values and biases in the therapeutic process. Completion of this course satisfies CAC I certification requirement in culturally informed treatment.

HSE 223 Group Counseling Skills (3)

Introduction to the basic theories of small groups through experiential learning to develop skills and strategies for effective group participation and leadership. The universality of feelings and concerns are shared so that one can recognize the dynamics of interpersonal interaction, predict dynamics accurately, demonstrate effective leadership skills, and learn to exercise control of the group process and interaction in small-group situations. Completion of this course satisfies CAC II certification requirement in group counseling skills.

HSE 226 Trauma Informed Care (3)

The causes and symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and the relationship of the disorder to substance abuse and violence in the form of domestic disturbances is studied along with interventions and treatment. Completion of this course satisfies CAC II certification requirement in trauma informed care for diverse populations.

HSE 240 Psychopathology and the Mental Health Clinician (3)

An introduction to biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural etiological perspectives of psychopathology and the basic treatment approaches and critical analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of mental disturbance labeling and societal implications. Emphasis on integrated treatment of co-occurring mental

HSE 246 Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing (3)

The primary goals of motivational interviewing are to engage clients, elicit change talk, and evoke motivation to make positive behavioral changes through goal-oriented counseling that helps clients explore and resolve ambivalence. Students learn interviewing skills specific to various stages of recovery and relapse in order to minimize or avoid resistance and to promote essential changes in substance abuse or domestic violence clients. Completion of this course satisfies CAC II certification requirement in motivational interviewing.

health, substance use disorders, and spiritual alliances, including shared decision making, integration of services, community outreach, reduction of negative consequences, long-term care as needed, motivation-based treatment, and multiple psychotherapeutic interventions. Completion of this course satisfies CAC II certification requirements in clinical assessment and treatment planning and in co-occurring disorders.

HSE 248 Therapeutic Cognitive Behavior (3)

This course examines the early and current development of cognitive behavior therapy as pioneered by Drs. Aaron Beck and Albert Ellis. Cognitive behavior has become one of the most widely used therapies during the last two decades. Students will apply C.B.T. by examining thoughts and beliefs connected to moods, behaviors, physical experiences, and events. Completion of this course satisfies CAC II certification requirement in cognitive behavioral therapy.

HSE 250 Addiction Treatment and Infectious Diseases (3)

Health issues including communicable and sexually transmitted diseases that are most likely to affect addicted individuals. Health issues found among individuals who might abuse mind-altering chemicals. Students perform risk assessments and prepare educational materials for clients. Completion of this course satisfies CAC I certification requirements in principles of addiction treatment and in infectious disease in addiction treatment.

HSE 251 Pharmacology of Drugs and Alcohol (3)

As a cornerstone of addiction counseling, the professional of behavioral health must understand the composition, classification, effects, uses, and abuses of drugs and alcohol. Students learn the ways that psychoactive substances impact the central nervous and immune systems. Related socioeconomic, cultural, ethnic, and familial diversity, moral-ethical, and political issues are integrated into the course content and treatment services considered. Completion of this course satisfies CAC I and II certification requirements in pharmacology I and II.

HSE 266 Ethical and Legal Issues in Human Services (3)

Basic understanding of the legal and ethical issues in the human services profession and provides an opportunity for students to apply standards from the code of ethics as well as laws in situations that often arise in agencies providing case management and counseling. Completion of this course satisfies CAC I and II certification requirements in ethics and jurisprudence and in professional ethics.

HSE 302 Addiction Counseling Skills (2)

Basic addiction counseling skills. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 303 Advanced Counseling Skills (2)

Advanced addiction counseling skills. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 311 Spiritual Alliances (1)

Counseling resources of spiritual alliances (church, synagogue, mosque, agency counseling, individual practitioners, educational programs, other faith based organizations) and family systems models in history and current theory and practice. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 314 Family Therapy (2)

Current marriage and family therapy theory and practice. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 315 Intimate Partner Abuse (1)

Patterns of abuse, dynamics of perpetrator treatment, from arrest to aftercare, victim and family considerations. Domestic violence CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 316 Court Testimony (1)

Skills necessary to provide appropriate, accurate, professional testimony as expert witnesses in the court system. Domestic violence CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 318 Specific Offender: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Issues (1)

Topics include: identity and coming-out, homophobia and civil rights, life-partnerships and co-parenting, treatment planning and accessibility. Domestic violence CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 319 Personality Disorders (1)

A psychologically integrated model of domestic violence intervention including review of the MCMI-III data and batterer typologies, risk assessment, treatment planning. Domestic violence CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 320 Intervention Techniques (1)

Community resources including Domestic Violence Treatment Service, Addiction Service and Mental-Health Treatment Service, and diagnosis. Domestic violence CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 321 Group Counseling Skills I (2)

Dynamics of group facilitation: didactic & experiential learning opportunities; stages of growth, curative factors, group process & leadership styles, principles and practice of facilitation techniques; faith based approaches.  CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 322 Group Counseling Skills II (2)

Advanced dynamics of group facilitation. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 324 Dialectical Behavior Therapy (1)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) assists clients with personality disorders to become more functional through an enhanced awareness of the techniques of other approaches to therapeutic intervention.

HSE 325 Trauma Issues (1)

Profiles and treatment of addicted batterers, including trauma symptoms, prevalence, and linkage to substance abuse. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 327 Trauma Informed Care for Diverse Populations (1)

The causes and symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and interventions and treatment. Completion of this course satisfies CAC II certification requirement in trauma informed care for diverse populations. Required for CAC II certification.

HSE 331 Clinical Supervision I (2)

Methods and techniques for clinical supervision; experiential training by which students learn and practice specific supervisory skills models and supervisory feedback techniques; course covers elements needed for the Colorado Alcohol and Drug Division CAC III certification.

HSE 332 Clinical Supervision II (1)

Advanced methods and techniques for clinical supervision; course covers elements needed for the Colorado Alcohol and Drug Division CAC III certification. Required for CAC III certification

HSE 341 Therapeutic Resistance (1)

Cognitive behavioral techniques, motivational interviewing, counseling the resistive client, including elements of addiction counseling prescribed by the Colorado Alcohol and Drug Division. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 342 Therapeutic Techniques (1)

Cognitive behavioral techniques; course covers elements needed for the Colorado Alcohol and Drug Division CAC II and CAC III certifications. CAC certification elective credit.

HSE 343 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (1)

A best practice in the treatment of addictive behavior disorders and shows the counselor how collaboratively to engage in an examination of beliefs and promote personal growth and client’s human potential.  Required for CAC III certifications.

HSE 344 Motivational Interviewing (1)

An accepted clinical standard in addictions treatment and counseling. Course covers motivation and positive change by having clients identify, clarify, and resolve ambivalence, and using principles and strategies through didactic presentations, exercises, active role playing. Required for CAC III certification.

HSE 345 Advanced Motivational Interviewing (1)

Consideration of advanced motivational interviewing practices in addictions treatment and counseling. Course covers client motivation and positive change. Required for CAC III certification.

HSE 352 Pharmacology I (1)

Basic physiological functioning of human anatomy, the impact of psychoactive substances on it, reasons people use chemicals to alter perception of the world, and classifications of controlled substances & other entities. Required for CAC I certification.

HSE 353 Pharmacology II (1)

Advanced physiological functioning of human anatomy, the impact of psychoactive substances on it, reasons people use chemicals to alter perception of the world, and classifications of controlled substances & other entities. Required for CAC 2 II certification.

HSE 354 Infectious Diseases (1)

Infectious disease treatment Pre- and post-test counseling, risk assessment, risk reduction, HIV/AIDS facts & impact on the family system. Required for CAC I certification.

HSE 355 Psychotherapy Internship I (3)

Supervised direct client contact in approved areas. Meets Colorado Division of Behavioral Health requirements for the Certified Addictions Counselor (CAC Level I).

HSE 356 Psychotherapy Internship II (3)

Supervised direct client contact in approved areas. Meets Colorado Division of Behavioral Health requirements for the Certified Addictions Counselor (CAC Level II).

HSE 357 Human Services Internship I (3)

Supervised direct client contact in approved areas.

HSE 358 Human Services Internship II (3)

Supervised direct client contact in approved areas.

HSE 359 Human Services Practicum I (8)

This practicum provides a beginning field experience in a human service agency or setting. In addition to the field service hours, students participate in an interactive seminar that supports the effectiveness of student learning at the placement site and allows students to apply theoretical knowledge learned in the core human services curriculum to real life situations and experiences. Students participate in a variety of hands-on activities to develop clinical and/or nonprofit management skills depending on the nature of the placement.

HSE 362 Profession Ethics I: Ethics and Jurisprudence (1)

Ethical issues and identification of ethical dilemmas, and jurisprudential requirements in the alcohol and drug clinical setting for counselors and programs. Required for CAC I certification.

HSE 363 Client Records Management (1)

Client records management for professional counselors, educators, and therapists. Required for CAC I certification.

HSE 364 Clinical Assessment and Treatment Planning (1)

Differential assessment and treatment planning including inclusion, identification, assessment processes, and the difference between substance abuse and dependence. CAC elective credit.

HSE 365 Professional Ethics II (1)

Process and resolution of specific ethical dilemmas. Required for CAC II certification

HSE 382 Anger Management (1)

Non-adversarial communication, anger management, loving without hurting/being hurt, conflict resolution and negotiating safety, aggressive replacement training, neuro-linguistic programming.

HSE 390 Fundamental of Intervention (3)

Community resources including Domestic Violence Treatment Service, Addiction Service and Mental-Health Treatment Service, and diagnosis, including domestic violence CAC certification elective credit. Skills necessary to provide appropriate, accurate, professional testimony as expert witnesses in the court system, including domestic violence CAC certification elective credit. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) assists clients with personality disorders to become more functional through an enhanced awareness of the techniques of other approaches to therapeutic intervention.

HSE 419 Culturally Informed Treatment (1)

Consideration of the spectrum of culturally informed treatment, including the trauma and impact of bias, prejudice, and discrimination based on gender, disabilities, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, physical ability, economic status, social class, educational level, language, and age. Required for CAC I certification.

HSE 421 Principles of Addiction: Diversity and Cultural Influences (1)

Diversity and cultural influences in addiction; issues for treatment providers in the African American, Hispanic, Native American, and Refugee communities; issues for treatment providers for women & men. CAC elective credit.

HSE 422 Principles of Addiction Treatment (2)

Diversity and cultural influences in addiction. Exploration of the client-oriented, counselor-directed models. CAC elective credit.

HSE 423 Diversity in Treatment Populations (1)

Issues for treatment providers vis-à-vis treatment populations including the African American, Hispanic, Native American, and Refugee communities. CAC elective credit.

HSE 424 Resistive Client (1)

Issues for treatment providers for women and for men. CAC elective credit.

HSE 426 Learning Styles (1)

Many different (offender) learning styles and focus on teaching methods/techniques (i.e., visual auditory, tactile/kinesthetic) to maximize rapport and communicate with each of the major learning styles. CAC elective credit.

HSE 427 Social Pathology (1)

Substance abuse, violence, abuses of women and children, crime, terrorism, corruption, criminality, discrimination, isolation, stigmatization and human rights violations. CAC elective credit.

HSE 428 Perpetrator: Evaluation and Risk Assessment (1)

Victim dynamics, victim’s issues (including Susan’s Story I and II), psychology of criminal conduct, defiance and criminal behavior, women defendants.

HSE 429 Grief and Loss (3)

Use of didactic and experiential techniques to recognize loss and stages of grief vis-à-vis developmental life stages and events and coping mechanisms of substance abuse; strategies of counselors to minimize feelings of helplessness and burnout.

HSE 435 Co-occurring Disorders (1)

Integrated treatment of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, including shared decision making, integration of services, community outreach, reduction of negative consequences, long-term care as needed, motivation-based treatment, and multiple psychotherapeutic interventions.

HSE 440 Pathologies of Violence (3)

Substance abuse, violence, abuses of women and children, crime, terrorism, corruption, criminality, discrimination, isolation, stigmatization and human rights violations. A psychologically integrated model of domestic violence intervention including review of the MCMI-III data and batterer typologies, risk assessment, treatment planning. Non-adversarial communication, anger management, loving without hurting/being hurt, conflict resolution and negotiating safety, aggressive replacement training, neuro-linguistic programming.

HSE 450 Human Services Internship III (3)

Supervised direct client contact in approved areas.

HSE 451 Psychotherapy Internship III (3)

Supervised direct client contact in approved areas. Meets Colorado Division of Behavioral Health requirements for the Certified Addictions Counselor (CAC Level III).

HSE 455 Professional Externship (12)

The professional externship is the culmination of training for the bachelor’s degree in Human Services. Students demonstrate readiness for professional employment while in a supervised placement within a human service agency or other nonprofit organization. Students integrate knowledge, skills, values and ethics in their placement and complete a project that supports the agency’s mission and is above and beyond the usual requirements of a job.

HSE 459 Human Services Practicum II (8)

This practicum provides continuing field experience in a human service agency or setting. In addition to the field service hours, students participate in an interactive seminar that supports the effectiveness of student learning at the placement site and allows students to apply theoretical knowledge learned in the core human services curriculum to real life situations and experiences. Students participate in a variety of hands-on activities to develop clinical and/or nonprofit management skills depending on the nature of the placement.

HSE 460 Clinical Supervision in Human Services (3)

Provides students with theoretical principles and practical application of clinical supervision in the human services field. The course will address specific regulatory requirements of clinical supervision. Evidence-based support for counseling and clinical supervision will be addressed. Completion of this course satisfies CAC III certification requirements in clinical supervision I and II, as well as domestic violence counselor supervisors.

HSE 469 Advanced Motivational Interviewing (1)

Interviewing skills specific to various stages of recovery and relapse that minimize or avoid resistance and promote essential changes in substance abuse or domestic violence clients. Focus on skill demonstrations, giving and receiving appropriate feedback, and directive counseling to help the client to examine and resolve ambivalence. Required for CAC III certification.

HSE 470 Advanced Motivational Interviewing and Professional Practice (3)

Interviewing skills specific to various stages of recovery and relapse that minimize or avoid resistance and promote essential changes in substance abuse or domestic violence clients. Focus on skill demonstrations, giving and receiving appropriate feedback, and directive counseling to help the client to examine and resolve ambivalence. The therapeutic professional practice and relationship as partnership or companionship compared with other counseling approaches (Family Systems Therapy, Reality Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Carl Rogers, Viktor Frankl, Alfred Adler, and Sigmund Freud). Completion of this course satisfies CAC III certification requirements in advanced motivational interviewing and professional practice.

HSE 475 Professional Practice (1)

The therapeutic professional practice and relationship as partnership or companionship. Required for CAC III certification.

HSE 480 Violence Offenders

Intimate partner patterns of abuse, dynamics of perpetrator treatment, from arrest to aftercare, victim and family considerations. Victim dynamics, victim’s issues (including Susan’s Story I and II), psychology of criminal conduct, defiance and criminal behavior, women defendants. Other specific offender topics include identity and coming-out, homophobia and civil rights, life-partnerships and co-parenting, treatment planning and accessibility.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (IDS)

IDS 504 Ideas and American History (3)

A non-sectarian review and evaluation of the influence of theological thought in American political, social, and economic life, including Deism and the Declaration of Independence, the Puritans and Calvinist theology in the writing of the Constitution and the Federalist Papers, and other metaphysical and moral philosophies, such as Transcendentalism, Social Darwinism, the Social Gospel, Pragmatism, Secular Humanism and John Dewey, New Deal Liberalism, Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement,  Reagan Conservatism, Evangelicalism, and post-Vatican II Catholicism that have shaped the American experience and democratic institutions.

IDS 505 Cities and Globalization (3)

Contemporary urban theory and comparative urban analysis, emphasizing how globalization is shaping urban form and problems. See how world cities have emerged in a global context, and learn about the development of public policies toward urban growth and change.

IDS 506 Made in America: The Continuing Revolution (3)

Delve into the ideas and politics of the world’s first modern revolution (1765-1801) that transformed thirteen colonies of the British Empire into a nation that has become a global supper power.

IDS 507 Western Literature and Globalization (3)

Evaluate the relationship between one of the most important books in history––the Bible––and geopolitical change, minorities, languages, and multilingualism/multiculturalism, and the ways that biblical concepts, idioms, and metaphors have become part of the global lingua franca for commerce, government, science, and technology.

IDS 509 Imagine the Soul of the American West (3)

The West is “America, only more so” (Stegner). This course will explore the reality and myth of the American West, as both a place in the mind and a state of mind––a cultural reference point for understanding the soul of America that often ignores historical reality, evokes nostalgia for a mythic past, and wrestles with American historical and cultural contradictions. Read novels, short stories, poems, historiography, essays, legal documents, and view films, photography and paintings.

IDS 510 Controversies in Science, Medicine, Ethics and Management (3)

An evaluation of how scientific developments drive ethical issues in medicine, including scientific advances in stem cells, genetic engineering, and reproductive technologies and how individuals, the marketplace, and democratic and managerial institutions deal with them.

IDS 521 Leadership and Management Systems (3)

Advanced project management including human relations approaches, program, evaluation, review technique. Preparation for testing for “Certified Associate in Project Management.”

IDS 522 Leadership and Management: Scope (3)

Scope theory and statements, discovery and documentation of agreements for executive management including project management, financial and risk planning, communication planning, and human relations management planning.

IDS 523 Leadership and Management for a Globalizing World (3)

Advanced analysis of scope, risk, cost, human relations communication, management of human resources, communication, time, quality procurement, integration management, professional responsibility, preparation for Project Management Professional certification.

IDS 531 Sociological and Psychological Perspectives (3)

Theories of the great sociologists, with psychological perspectives and application to modern society, including the sociological method (Peter Berger), suicide theory (Emil Durkheim), bureaucracy (Max Weber), unintended consequences (Robert Merton), poverty theory (William Julius Wilson).

IDS 541 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3)

Science and application of I/O psychology (work psychology) and project management to human capital, workplaces, and organizations.

LANGUAGE (LAN)

LAN 103 English as Second Language I (2)

Basic principles of English for reading and comprehension, including grammar and pronunciation. Limited to students whose native language is not English.

LAN 104 English as Second Language II (2)

Intermediate English for speaking and writing, including vocabulary building. Limited to students whose native language is not English.

LAN 123 Hebrew I (2)

Basic principles of classical Hebrew for reading & comprehension, including grammar and pronunciation.

LAN 124 Hebrew II (2)

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew for reading and comprehension of the Old Testament in its original language, including vocabulary building.

LAN 133 Greek I (2)

Basic principles of Greek for reading & comprehension, including grammar and pronunciation.

LAN 134 Greek II (2)

Intermediate Greek for reading and comprehension, including vocabulary building.

LAN 143 Spanish I (2)

Basic principles of Spanish for reading and comprehension, including grammar and pronunciation.

LAN 144 Spanish II (2)

Intermediate Spanish for speaking and writing, including vocabulary building.

LAN 255 Language Practicum (3)

Language reading practicum. Prerequisites: Two terms (6 credits) in the language.

LAN 256 English Language Practicum (2)

Language reading practicum. Prerequisites: Two terms (6 credits) in the language.

LAN 257 Hebrew Language Practicum (2)

Language reading practicum. Prerequisites: Two terms (6 credits) in the language.

LAN 258 Greek Language Practicum (2)

Language reading practicum. Prerequisites: Two terms (6 credits) in the language.

LAN 259 Spanish Language Practicum (2)

Language reading practicum. Prerequisites: Two terms (6 credits) in the language.

LEADERSHIP (LDR)

LDR 202 Leadership and Management (3)

Motivational theory related to individual and group functions; functional and dysfunctional leadership styles; synthesis of those functional styles that work best to create the ultimate style.

LDR 211 Group and Organizational Dynamics (3)

How culture aids and hinders organizational effectiveness and leadership: planned change as a social process & a model to describe the stages of the process; the process of organizational formation & change; how group behavior affects organizational effectiveness, decision-making, and group conflicts; strategies for efficient group and task management.

LDR 221 The City: Context for Change (3)

Using systems thinking and models to explore how the city works––politically, economically, socially, and demographically, with emphasis on forces that shape neighborhoods and transform them.

LDR 231 Community and Social Analysis (3)

Community analysis and its relevance to social justice action; analytical approaches to problems and exploration of suggestions and questions they raise for community and faith-based leadership responses; focus on Denver’s changing landscapes, people, and churches.

LDR 241 Urban Leadership and Management (3)

Essential qualities to personal leadership and development in self and others, including mentoring, apprenticeship, praxis relationship, and urban leadership models; practical strategies for ministry and ways that churches and faith-based organizations organize and implement such strategies, including mentoring, tutoring, health clinics, affordable housing, street outreach, shelters, and education.

LDR 251 Research and Urban Analysis (3)

Application of principles and methods of social science research to urban issues and urban leadership: scientific inquiry; role of theory; conceptualization; observation, measurement, & presentation of data.

LDR 281 Intercultural Communication (3)

Concepts, principles, and skills for improving communication between persons from different minority, racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds; emphasis is on public speaking and small group meeting formats. (Cognate SPE 281)

LDR 350 Faith-Based Leadership Project I (3)

Individual project that applies leadership concepts to faith-based organizations and community organizing.

LDR 361 Faith-Based Communities and Renewal (3)

Religious and democratic renewal for humane, spirit-grounded social change; exposure to persons of different generations, faith commitments, racial and ethnic groups, educational levels, and nationalities.

LDR 371 Demographics and Planning (3)

Analysis urbanization, problems, and opportunities for faith-based organizations: strategies for community planning, organizational theory, critical management theory, public policy issues related to urban ministry.

LDR 401 Local Government Politics and Policy (3)

Introduction to fundamental forces that shape local government policies (e.g., liberal-democratic tendencies & free market forces; policy formation values & resource allocation; thinking strategically).

LDR 411 Building Indigenous Communities (3)

The role of faith-based community organizing for revitalization and building communities from the inside out; strategies for locating assets, skills & capacities of residents, citizen, and local institutions; how the post-modern visual culture impacts human perspectives, how to build reclaiming structures.

LDR 412 Transformative Systems Management (3)

Organizational evaluation using a systems model: analysis of solving organizational problems, with application to work-related issues, projects in business and community, and to strategic change leadership.

LDR 421 Urban Life and Christian World View (3)

Components of a coherent world view vis-à-vis a sense of community, vision, and purpose; significant contemporary worldviews, critical and appreciative analysis of worldviews; Christian theology and its relationship to social ministry and evangelism; exploration of the importance of a Christian worldview for contemporary urban life and “doing theology in ministry from the bottom up.” (Cognate SOC 421)

LDR 431 Community Economic Development (3)

Community-based economic development for self-sufficient ministries and faith-based organizations; models, tools and methods to engage congregations in community development.

LDR 443 Leadership in the Faith-Based Organization (3)

Character and competencies for leaders in the urban context including how to start a non-profit organization, how to raise funds, how to build a leadership team.

LDR 450 Faith-Based Leadership Project II (3)

A continuation of LDR 350.

LDR 451 Autobiography: Tracking Personal Change (3)

How family, ethnic, economic, philosophical, and theological backgrounds and influences shape a person’s life, sense of calling, and purpose; students identify and analyze key events in their life journey.

LDR 461 Urban Anthropology (3)

Cultural systems of cities & linkages to other population groups & worldwide urban system; ethnographic research of cultural systems, attitudes, & behaviors of U.S. domestic minorities; focus on the African-American and Hispanic-American experience in the United States, including religious movements; the farm workers and Civil Rights movements; and the Third Reconstruction of the American experience. (Cognate SOC 461)

LDR 463 Power and Powerlessness (3)

Development and scope of services and communities through servant leadership in which the least are the greatest, the last are first, and the lost are found.

LDR 471 Urban World and Globalism (3)

Introduction to urbanology: the ethos of the city, the international urbanization milieu, the social & scriptural role of faith-based organizations, and models of current ministry positions in urban settings; what changes in the cultural landscape mean for the individual, the local community, and the church.

LDR 473 Transformational Family Systems (3)

The complex world of family and its meaning for mission in the city; review of functional and dysfunctional family structures; how to serve high-risk youth and their families.

LDR 483 Change Agents: Individuals & Institutions (3)

Principles, psychology, and dynamics of change for individuals and institutions and the role of transformational leadership.

LITERATURE (LIT)

LIT 201 Introduction to Literature (3)

Introduction to the four major literary genres: non-fiction, fiction, poetry, and drama: reading and textual analysis (interpretation) of the English Bible and other Western literature, including Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, novel, and a Shakespearian or modern drama. This course must be completed at APU.

LIT 209 Classic and Popular Literature (3)

Reading, analysis, and enjoyment of classic and popular literature: a classic novel, novella, & short story; a popular novel (romance, fantasy, science fiction, mystery, adventure); a Shakespearean & modern play.

LIT 211 Shakespeare (3)

A study of selected works of Shakespeare and a few of the adaptations to other media, including the films Kiss Me Kate, West Side Story, and 10 Things I Hate About You.

LIT 231 Proverbial Literature (3)

Analysis of the interrelated worldviews of Proverbs, the Book of Job, and Ecclesiastes, with applications for modern life.

LIT 261 Literature and Spiritual Life (3)

Literature and spirituality of common life experiences (rejection, relationships, self-confidence, life purpose, family life) and spiritual disciplines (meditation, prayer, fasting, simplicity, solitude, service, confession, worship). (Cognate THE 241)

LIT 301 Literary Analysis (3)

Literary analysis/hermeneutics applied to biblical literature: lower & higher criticism; analysis of biblical literary genres; historic debates & current issues of biblical interpretation; resources for biblical research. (Cognate THE 311)

LIT 303 Genre Literature (3)

Literary analysis applied to specific literary forms, such as the classical Greek genres of poetry, drama, and prose or modern genres, including drama, comedy, tragedy, tragicomedy, romance, satire, novel, novella, short story, science fiction, pulp fiction, apocalyptic, biography, autobiography.

LIT 310 Bible as Literature (3)

Biblical authorship, literature, themes, hermeneutics, culture, history, geography, and the place of the Bible in history, literature, legal and ethical systems, and culture and religious life.

MATHEMATICS (MAT)

MAT 110 College Algebra (3)

Using algebra to interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models; representing mathematical information symbolically, graphically, numerically, and verbally; and problem solving including algebraic expressions, complex numbers, solutions to functions including exponential and logarithmic.

MAT 211 General Statistics (3)

Normal distributions, calculations, time series, correlation, multi-data analysis, causation, experimentation, probability, random variables, binominal distributions, mean, median, mode with applications to professional fields and for general usage.

PHILOSOPHY (PHL)

PHL 201 Figures in Western Philosophy (3)

Figures studied will include three to five of the following: Plato, Aristotle, Jesus of Nazareth, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Hobbes, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, James, Nietzsche, Sartre, Marx, Derrida Lewis, with emphasis on their logical, critical thinking, epistemological, metaphysical, ethical, aesthetic, and axiological insights and contributions.

PHL 211 Introduction to Ethics and Society (3)

Analysis of traditional and contemporary problems in ethics & morality in context of social & political philosophy: unbridled materialism, narcissistic humanism, power & violence. This course must be completed at APU.

PHL 221 Critical Thinking (3)

Introduction to critical thinking skills: informal and formal logic, problem-solving, and decision-making.

PHL 221 Ethics in the Urban World (3)

Introduction to ethical issues of justice and compassion and how individuals and organizations can practice and sustain ethical choices in an urbanized world, with a focus on ethical issues encountered as the church moves out into its community and guiding principles for faith-based organizations and individuals to make choices reflecting God’s concern for justice and compassion and how to create and sustain Christian mission in a programmed world.

PHL 241 Argument and Persuasion (3)

Evaluation, confirmation, & application of truth claims; Analysis of classical apologetic presentations and defenses of Christian faith and truth claims compared to other philosophical systems.

PHL 281 Personal and Social Ethics (3)

Exploration of three dimensions of ethics (personal ethics, social ethics, professional practice), with applications to one’s personal and professional life (business, church, community leadership).

PHL 301 Faith-Based Community Foundations (3)

The ethical and biblical basis for doing faith-based community development; focus on what it means to be human and Christian and what the Bible says about faith-based organizations.

PHL 311 Critical Thinking and Analysis (3)

Critical thinking, informal and formal logic, problem-solving, decision-making, research and analysis, and inductive experimentation, with applications to education, business, management, church, media, government.

PHL 331 Faith and Social Responsibility (3)

Relationship of church and community: a biblical approach to the poor & marginalized amid affluence, the development of a practical theology for urban ministry, and examples of faith-based social activism.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (P0L)

POL 101 Politics of Sports (3)

Focus on the internal and external political dimensions of sports and consideration of solutions to the problems that exist as a result.

POL 111 American National Government (3)

The American political process with emphasis on the federal government: organization, formal and informal sources of power and influence, political attitudes and behavior of American citizens, civil rights, constitutional evolution, factors of change and stability.

POL 121 World Geography (3)

A regional study of the planet emphasizing its ecological, economic, and political interdependency: includes geopolitics and environmental factors that contribute to cultural diversity and the complex relationship between the developed and underdeveloped worlds.

POL 201 Introduction to Political Science (3)

Introduction to politics, including the American political ideals and system compared to other systems (e.g., Socialism, Marxism, Fascism), political philosophy (e.g., from the Greeks to Christendom to Jefferson to the post-modern era), economic theory, geopolitical issues, and social responsibility & ethics.

POL 221 Race, Gender and Justice (3)

The politics of race and gender in America, with focus on the Civil Rights Movement and women’s rights.

POL 231 Politics of Civil Rights (3)

History and current issues of the Civil Rights movement in the United States.

POL 241 American Political Systems (3)

Organization, powers, functions, and practical workings of state, country, town city governments of the United States, with emphasis on federal-state relations and Colorado state government and constitution.

POL 250 Political Science Internship (3)

Students are placed in state or local legislative staff positions or in campaign offices according to their own interests and goals. Generally, the work assignment is up to 20 hours a week for a semester.

POL 251 Government Internship (3)

Students are placed in state or local government agency relationships according to their own interests and goals. Generally, the work assignment is up to 20 hours a week for a semester.

POL 261 Political Theory (3)

Examination of Western Civilization’s political ideas and ideals from Plato and Aristotle through Edmund Burke, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Karl Marx, Martin Luther King, Jr., with focus on the state, humanity, justice, and politics.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

PSY 205 Applied Psychology (3)

Overview of the field of psychology including applications of learning, perception, motivation, emotion, heredity, personality, development, abnormal and psychotherapy; development, implementation, and interpretation of research data.

PSY 215 Cognitive Psychology (Age Specific) (3)

An examination of the way humans think, problem solve & a look at below normal ability & some of its causes & effects.

PSY 221 General Psychology (3)

Introduction to the field of psychology including learning, perception, motivation, emotion, heredity, personality, development, abnormal and psychotherapy.

PSY 231 Life-Span Developmental Psychology (3)

This course of for students who do not have a specific age group they wish to work with in the future.

PSY 241 Abnormal Psychology (3)

An overview & critical examination of Abnormal Psych with very limited exposure to the DSM.

PSY 251 Counseling Skills Praxis (3)

Foundational understanding & skill development in the practice of individual, family, and group counseling, by means of instructional, case studies, experiential, and practicum components of the course.

PSY 301 Psychology and Group Dynamics (3)

The psychology and dynamics of the nature and process of groups, including group formation, dissolution, communication, leadership, facilitation, decision-making, conflict resolution, and therapy. Development and application of group-related psychology and skills.

PSY 308 Career Psychology (3)

Overview of the various psychometric tools and analysis and understanding of the underlying research of those tools as it applies to career psychology, development and guidance. The student will gain an ability to evaluate, give guidance, and appreciate the uniqueness of an individual in need of career assistance.

PSY 311 Age Specific Developmental Psychology (Child & Adolescent) (3)

Consideration of human development geared to the age with which the student wishes to work.

PSY 331 Social Psychology (3)

An examination of how human social interactions affects the individual.

PSY 335 Human Nature and Psychological Method (3)

Exploration of theories of human nature and psychological method and preparation of students who wish to work in the helping field to examine how what we believe human nature to be impacts the methodologies we choose in helping.

PSY 341 Tests & Measurements (Experimental Psychology) (3)

An examination of tests & measures used in psychology & a critical look at how & why they are developed.

PSY 350 Institutional Psychology Practicum I (3)

An opportunity for students to put into practice things learned in class & through hands on experience gain new understanding of the use of psychology in mental health by organizations.

PSY 351 Therapeutic Psychology Practicum I (3)

Opportunities for students to put into practice things learned in class & through hands on experience gain new understanding of the use of psychology in mental health in a therapeutic context.

PSY 401 Environmental Psychology and Lab (3)

An examination of the interaction & relationship of humans & their environment. In the lab the students will explore & evaluate current different environments for their “ergonomic” effectiveness.

PSY 441 Neural Psychology (3)

An examination of the brain/nervous system & related functions/abilities.

PSY 450 Institutional Psychology Practicum II (3)

Opportunities for students to put into practice things learned in class & through hands on experience gain new understanding of the use of psychology by organizations.

PSY 451 Therapeutic Psychology Practicum II (3)

Opportunities for students to put into practice things learned in class & through hands on experience gain new understanding of the use of psychology in mental health in a therapeutic context.

PSY 461 Death and Dying (3)

Universal and timeless, death and dying are the life experiences integral to human existence. What and how we experience, give order to, make sense of, and live out these journeys in our lives and in relation to others within societal, cultural, philosophical, and spiritual contexts.

PSY 471 Psychology of Religion (3)

The development of religious attitudes and the psychological factors involved in religious cultures. This course will explore religion from a psychological and a theological, perspective.

PSY 481 Behavioral Psychology (3)

In contrast to cognitive psychology which focuses on consciousness, mental states, and subjective phenomena such as ideas and emotions, behavioral psychology studies objectively observable and measurable data and mental and physical activity that can be explained in terms of human response to external stimuli. Focus on the theories of Ivan Pavlov, John B. Watson, and B. F. Skinner, among others.

PSY 490 Capstone in Psychology (3)

Individually or collaboratively, using various methods (paper, research, experimentation, or current work, etc.) students demonstrate the range and scope of their understanding and/or mastery of psychological principles and practices.

SCIENCE (SCI)

SCI 201 Introduction to Astronomy (4)

A survey of modern observations of astronomy (e.g., the moon, planets, stars, and their formations) history & social implications of astronomy. Lab work gives a greater appreciation of the universe.

SCI 211 Earth Systems Science (4)

Exploration of the solid earth, oceans and atmosphere as an integrated set of systems that act together to control climate, topography and other physical aspects of the natural environment, including lab work.

SCI 221 Science and The Scientific Method (4)

The Scientific Method––including the exact and inexact sciences, and the history of science from Aristotle to Roger Bacon, to Isaac Newton, to Albert Einstein and the 20th century. Includes introductions to the eighteen great scientific discoveries of the 19th and 20th centuries––including relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and ecosystems. Lab work is included.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

SOC 151 Fundamentals of Social Change (2)

Establish a vision and confirm the student’s potential for individual social change resulting in a life of productive self-sufficient citizenship.

SOC 152 Dynamics of Social Change (2)

The role of motivation and structures for individual social change. Prerequisite: SOC 151.

SOC 221 Introduction to Sociology (3)

Patterns and processes of human social relations: the sociological method, socialization, cultures & subcultures, prejudices, stereotypes, racism and discrimination, urbanization & urbanology; domestic violence dynamics, and conflict resolution. Review of the great sociologists, including Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Robert Merton, Talcott Persons, and William Julius Wilson.

SOC 251 Sociology of Self-Sufficiency (1)

Develop the plan outlined in the prerequisite courses for individual social change resulting in a life of productive self-sufficient citizenship. Prerequisites: SOC 151, 152.

SOC 252 Assessment of Self-Sufficiency (1)

Practicum in demonstrating the student’s attainment of individual social change resulting in a life of productive self-sufficient citizenship. Prerequisite: SOC 251.

SOC 253 Outcomes of Self-Sufficiency (1)

The rehabilitation process and rewards of individual social change resulting in a life of productive self-sufficient citizenship. Prerequisite: SOC 252.

SOC 271 Interpersonal Sociology (3)

Individual and group behaviors, work ethic, professionalism, and human resource skills necessary for vocational success, including (1) Individual and group behaviors with respect to the development of life and career skills; (2) strategic life planning for a successful life, financial self-reliance, and career advancement; (3) health, fitness, and leadership for community development, urban renewal, and the environment; and (4) practices of successful people for personal and vocational success.

SOC 272 Professional Development (3)

Employment research, search, and acquisition skills. Topics include matching qualifications with vocational requirements, resume preparation, and job applications. Also includes writing effective cover letters, follow-up letters, resignation letters, and recommendation letters. Classroom activities include discussion of basic interviewer questions and techniques and interviewee responses and strategies. Students are exposed to basic motivation theories, values clarification, and philosophic principles.

SOC 350 Servant Corps Internship I (3-6)

Service learning program: social work, education, human & family services, child development, non-profit administration, personal growth, and rescue mission work amid a residential rehabilitation community.

SOC 351 Servant Corps Internship II (3-6)

Continuation of SOC 350. Service learning program: social work, education, human & family services, child development, non-profit administration, personal growth, and rescue mission work amid a residential rehabilitation community.

SOC 421 Sociology of Urban Life and World View (3)

Components of a coherent world view vis-à-vis a sense of community, vision, and purpose; significant contemporary worldviews, critical and appreciative analysis of worldviews; Christian theology and its relationship to social ministry and evangelism; exploration of the importance of a Christian worldview for contemporary urban life and “doing theology in ministry from the bottom up.” (Cognate LDR 421)

SOC 461 Urban Sociology and Anthropology (3)

Cultural systems of cities & linkages to other population groups & worldwide urban system; ethnographic research of cultural systems, attitudes, & behaviors of U.S. domestic minorities; focus on the African-American and Hispanic-American experience in the United States, including religious movements; the farm workers and Civil Rights movements; and the Third Reconstruction of the American experience.

SPEECH (SPE)

SPE 201 Introduction to Speech (3)

Preparation, techniques, delivery, and objectives of public oral communication in large and small groups.

SPE 281 Cross-Cultural Communication (3)

Concepts, principles, and skills for improving communication between persons from different minority, racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds; emphasis is on public speaking and small group meeting formats. (Cognate LDR 281)

STUDY ABROAD (STA)

STA 201 Central America Field Studies (3-6)

Field study in Central America.

STA 202 Cross-Cultural Adaptation––Europe (3-6)

Focus on cultural adaptation in the context of a multicultural team working with gypsy orphans in Romania; emphasis is on becoming a language/culture-learner and identifying key cultural elements.

STA 203 Cross-Cultural Adaptation––Africa (3-6)

Focus on cultural adaptation in the context of a multicultural team working with HIV orphans in Kenya and Zimbabwe; emphasis is on becoming a language/culture-learner and identifying key cultural elements.

STA 204, 205, 206 Cross-Cultural Adaptation––Women of the World (3-9)

First-hand cross-cultural adaptation by first world women relative to second & third world women of Africa, Romania, or Armenia emphasizing being a language/culture-learner, identifying key cultural elements, promoting human rights, developing resources, and building cultural bridges & infrastructure.

THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY (THE)

THE 201 Faith and Work (3)

Philosophical and practical evaluation of work in its occupational, vocational, and service applications as an endeavor of human spirituality and divine teleology.

THE 207 Introduction to Spiritual Formation (3)

Analysis of philosophical, foundational, and existential components and practices of human spirituality for personal application; Analysis of the ministerial role and techniques of nurturing in others the application of the philosophical, foundational, and existential components and practices of human spirituality.

THE 215 Apologetics and Persuasion (3)

Evaluation of tools for evaluating, confirming, & applying truth claims; Analysis of classical apologetic presentations and defenses of Christian faith and truth claims compared to other philosophical systems.

THE 217 Prologue to the Life of Christ: Incarnation (3)

Analysis of the political, cultural, and religious context of the First Century into which Jesus Christ came and lived as the incarnate word of God.

THE 218 Challenges to the Life of Christ: Temptations (3)

Via Christ’s temptations, an analysis of cultural and ethical values and consideration of classical Christian responses, relationships, and roles of cultural and ethical engagement.

THE 219 Life of Christ I: Kingdom of God (3)

Analysis of the Sermon on the Mount and the Kingdom of God as the transformational principles and the seminal message of Jesus Christ.

THE 220 Life of Christ II: Nature of Man (3)

Analysis of the nature of man and the inherent conflict between personal freedom and integrity and the religious and political establishment.

THE 221 Life of Christ III: Redemption (3)

The redemptive paradigm & expectations of Jesus compared with other transformational philosophies of such sources as Plato, Marx, and modern social analysis.

THE 222 Life of Christ IV: World Religion (3)

Founders, organization, and agenda of the primitive Christian church that have led to the development of a world religion and the spiritual foundation of Western Civilization.

THE 241 Devotional Theology (3)

Literature and spirituality of common life experiences (rejection, relationships, self-confidence, life purpose, family life) and spiritual disciplines (meditation, prayer, fasting, simplicity, solitude, service, confession, worship). (Cognate LIT 261)

THE 251 Biblical and Religious Topics (3)

The Biblical themes of the Hebrew religious system, Jesus’ Gospel of the Kingdom of God, and Paul’s teaching on grace & the Body of Christ; Evaluation of historical and modern religious concepts.

THE 305 Spiritual Formation I (3)

Analysis of philosophical, foundational, and existential components and practices of human spirituality for personal application.

THE 306 Spiritual Formation II (3)

Analysis of the ministerial role and techniques of nurturing in others the application of the philosophical, foundational, and existential components and practices of human spirituality.

THE 310 Introduction to the Bible (3)

Biblical authorship, literature, themes, hermeneutics, culture, history, geography, and the place of the Bible in history, literature, legal and ethical systems, and culture and religious life.

THE 311 Biblical Interpretation (3)

Literary analysis/hermeneutics applied to biblical literature: lower & higher criticism; analysis of biblical literary genres; historic debates & current issues of biblical interpretation; resources for biblical research. (Cognate LIT 301)

THE 342 Apologetic Christology (3)

A study of the Christological apologetic of the Epistle to the Hebrews, which utilizes Old Testament symbolisms and comparisons, that demonstrates the preeminent reality of a Christocentric theological system, redemptive paradigm, and religious praxiology.

THE 350 Oral Communication Practicum (3)

Preparation, techniques, delivery, and objectives of public oral communication in large and small groups, emphasizing the modalities of teaching and preaching.

THE 351 Theological Education By Extension (3)

Introduction to T.E.E., a proven andragogical method for the religious instruction of adults in America, Europe, and the Third World; evaluation of “learning” as “long-term change shown in appropriate ways.”

THE 352 Church School Curricula & Administration (3)

Church school curricula development, publishers, and administration of church educational programs.

THE 361 Biblical Greek I (2)

Basic principles of Koine Greek for reading & comprehension, including grammar and pronunciation.

THE 362 Biblical Greek II (2)

Intermediate Greek for reading and comprehension of the New Testament in its original language, including vocabulary building. Prerequisite: THE 361.

THE 363 Biblical Greek III (2)

Greek reading practicum in the New Testament and other Middle Greek texts. Prerequisites: THE 361 and THE 362.

THE 371 Theological Concepts of Leadership (3)

Analysis of the biblical leadership roles of prophet, priest, and king, the model of Jesus Christ, and First Century church leadership positions vis-à-vis the principles and practices of servant leadership.

THE 381 Church Development (3)

Analysis of five components of a start-up organization, group dynamics and leadership necessary for effective organization, organizational culture, and traditions related to long-term continuation and vitality.

THE 382 Starting Urban Churches (3)

Analysis of the aesthetic, environmental, and theological aspects of the city & the emergence of churches in an urban venue; development of strategies, methodologies, and techniques for starting city churches.

THE 392 Rescue Ministry (3)

The history and philosophy of rescue mission ministry in the United States and England, with focus on pioneering and archetypical missions, including Pacific Garden in Chicago and Denver Rescue Mission.

THE 393 Rescue Mission Chaplaincy (3)

Supervised internship of the normal duties of rescue mission chaplaincy: the mission chapel & services, managing volunteers, addressing client material & spiritual needs, and public speaking.

THE 394 Evangelism and Discipleship (3)

Spiritual formation outreach and cultivation skills, including communicating spiritual precepts, one-to-one mentoring, and spiritual disciplines that help novitiates move toward spiritual formation, personal fulfillment, and philanthropic service.

THE 396 Spiritual Formation and Nurture (3)

Spiritual formation counseling and cultivation skills, including counseling methods, spiritual coaching, and spiritual exercises that help counselees move toward spiritual formation, personal fulfillment, and philanthropic service.

THE 401 The Pentateuch I (3)

Analytical and practical study of the first five books of the Bible: creation narratives, fall of man, divine judgment, Patriarchs of Israel, the divine plan for the ages in the Messiah. Primary focus on Genesis.

THE 402 The Pentateuch II (3)

Analytical and practical study of the first five books of the Bible: revelation of God in redemption, the Exodus, giving and codification of the Law, the Hebrew sacrificial system in Exodus thru Deuteronomy.

THE 411 Letters of